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Post Info TOPIC: Proper chain adjustment?


Newbie

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Proper chain adjustment?
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just installed a new chain and drive sprocket on my 2000 TTR250, i adjusted the chain as per the manual with it up in the air on a stand so the front and rear tiresicon1.png hang free and the adjusted the slack to about 1.65 inches up down movement, set the bikeicon1.png down and ride around and it just seems like it has a ton of free play, read about the 3 finger test and i can fit dang near my whole hand under the chain...does this sound right?


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LRJ


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My Yamaha owner's manual (2000 TT-R North American) indicates that the chain slack should be measured (and adjusted) while the bike is on the ground, but unladen. The "wheels in the air" part is just to find where the chain is tightest. Then you are supposed to set the bike down to measure the slack. I am surprised that you don't end up with the chain being overly tight, using the technique that you describe. Perhaps I am misunderstanding the description of your approach.

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The extract below is from the Yamaha owners manual and suggests checking with the bike on the ground:

Chain adjustment - copied from owners manual.jpg



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I downloaded the 1999 manual, and that says "35 - 50 mm with elevated rear wheel".

Lee



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burton500 wrote:

I downloaded the 1999 manual, and that says "35 - 50 mm with elevated rear wheel".

Lee


 That's what my 1999 manual says also...

Remember to turn the wheel around to find the tightest position & tighten it there.. .....

...............

Jarrah.



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On my Blue TTR, I find when I adjust the chain the lower chain guide restricts the movement. The chain will only move so far before it is restricted, which can give a 'false' measurement. So I usually go one setting too far and then back it off. Does anyone else notice this?

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As the engine sprocket and swinging arm spindle are on different centres, the chain goes tighter as the suspension compresses. I used a ratchet strap around the swing arm to hold it in its tightest position then set the wheel position so there was a little slack in the chain. This ensures that the chain doesnt prevent full suspension movement or overload the wheel bearings or sprocket shaft bearing when the suspension compresses. When the strap was removed i took a measurement from the swinging arm to the middle of chain run with the rear wheel off the floor. next time i adjust the chain i can use that measurement without having to compress the suspension again.



-- Edited by alanwebbo on Saturday 21st of February 2015 06:45:26 PM

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Hi Alan, I'd like to know that measurement from the swinging arm to the centre of the chain run please.
Cheers,
Robin.

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the distance will depend on the sprocket sizes you are running and the length of your chain. You just need to go through the procedure once on your bike to get the measurement.



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I'll be doing that. Thanks for the idea, which avoids the slightly confusing other approaches, what really matters is keeping enough slack to avoid damage to the gearbox output shaft/bearing/seal.

Robin.





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