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Need new chain and sprockets, where to buy and what gearing?
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Guys,

My chain and sprockets got a little rusty last winter when riding in the salt to and from work and laning a couple of times.

There is very little wear but the chain has rusted now and when it gets past a certain point there is no recovering it.

I've not used my bike all year due to injury however I want to start laning again in the new year once my fitness is back again, and want to go about restoring the bike to it's near perfect condition.

What gearing do people reccomend? There are two reccomendations on TTR250FAQ, which is the best compromise for dual sporting?

Where's the cheapest place to get a set online? I'm not worried about spending lots on the best chain etc, I just want a cheap reliable chain that isn't going to snap on me, and can be easily unclipped for cleaning.

I'm thinking I should be able to get the lot for little more than £60 delivered.

Cheers,

Conrad



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Welcome, Conrad, to the TTR forum. smile

If you look at the top left hand corner of this page, just above the horizontal blue line, you will see "The TTR250 FAQ web pages".

Click on this link and it will take you to the chain and sprocket section that will answer your question.

If your neglected chain is an o-ring type then maybe you would get a little more life from it by paraffin cleansing and lubricating copiusly with old engine oil, before spending cash on a replacement - especially if it's only surface rust. confuse

If the links are seized though, then that's a different matter and a replacement would be better. cry

Martyn



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Budleigh Salterton. Devon



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Hi Martyn

I have read that, as I said there are two different options 13-48 or 14-52, is there any noticeable difference between them? Or are they effectively the same? I know generally +3 on the rear is about -1 on the front (very generally speaking) so guess there is nothing between them.

I have cleaned it with parrafin and lubricated it a great deal but it just keeps getting worse even without additional salt, no siezed links yet but I want it to look shiney again and have peace of mind it's not going to snap on me.



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14-52 is kinder on the chain but the chain guide at the bottom of the swing arm near the rear sprocket may need a bit of adjustment.

Brian



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Sorry, Conrad, when I re-read your post I see that I didn't answer fully (slapped wrists). hmm

I run my TTR on 13/46 and I have found it performs very capably on this. The chain is cleaned and splashed with old engine oil after each ride and it hasn't needed adjusting in a year. (yet!)

I understand that any lower than 13 on the gearbox has detrimental effect on the chain and sprocket. Something to do with cyclical pitch being greater and the chain running over the smaller radius getting worn more quickly.

13/48 and 14/52 set ups give the same top speeds, according to my gear ratio spreadsheet. As Brian says, though, the smaller front sprocket would tend to knack the chain quicker. Best compromise would point to the 14/52 for optimum performance/rate of wear IMO.

Martyn



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Budleigh Salterton. Devon



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Great, thanks guys.

Will get something ordered and hopefully get back on the trails soon.

Also noticed my bike was difficult to push out of the garage last time I moved it, suspect the rear caliper is binding a little.

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I've been there and done that too. wink

I replaced my disk AND pads but failed to check the freedom of the caliper pins. This resulted in the pads making the disk too hot, thus wearing the pads out very quickly. hmm

I was unaware that the whole caliper needed to slide on the two fixed pins because it was rather solidly fixed.

I removed the whole assembly and freed it by using a vice and "Manchester Screwdriver" biggrin

On reassembly I ensured plenty of copperslip was applied to restore it to full health. aww

Martyn



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Budleigh Salterton. Devon



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See http://www.ttr250.com/#Fitting rear pads. and follow the link to http://www.ttr250.com/TTR250_brake_slide_pins_and_rubbers.pdf where there is a visual explanation of Martyn's suggestion as to a possible reason for your brakes binding.



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No problem with servicing the caliper, I've had loads of different calipers in bits over the years.

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Gone for a 112 link RK o-ring chain and 14-42 gearing, should be here in a few days so a job for Christmas!

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Brick_Top wrote:

Gone for a 112 link RK o-ring chain and 14-42 gearing, should be here in a few days so a job for Christmas!


 14 -42  that will be fairly fast top end speed, I'd be interested how you fair off road  



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I have 14 front 44 rear on mine and it sits at 70 fine but it won't pull very well in 6th on slight hills on the road, as suggested off roading with that gearing could be interesting in tight spots.

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14-52 I meant!



-- Edited by Brick_Top on Thursday 15th of December 2011 07:58:27 PM

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Brick_Top wrote:

14-52 I meant!



-- Edited by Brick_Top on Thursday 15th of December 2011 07:58:27 PM


 Thats better, I got this set up recently. Just elongate the lower guide bolt holes with a small round file so it sits lower.  



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Colin,

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Thanks Colin - the guy at busters told me the standard gearing was 13-52, which didn't seem correct as that would be much shorter again...

Did you have to file away for ages or was it relatively little filing (I guess it will be soft aluminium anyway).

I was too lazy (it's frickin cold out) to check what gearing was on the bike when I bought it.

Cheers,

Con

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Providing you have a nice new/sharp small 1/4" file its just a few minutes filing the relative thin gauge stainlees holes of the cage that incases the nylon block.
The holes only require elongating about 2mm.

1/4" and 2mm! Thats a product of doing my engineering apprenticship in the 1970's when we had seperate imperial and metric machine shops!!

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Thanks Colin, I believe I snapped my needle file so will pick another one up tomorrow.

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Conrad

“Needle file” might be a bit too delicate and small in diameter, it will work but will be slow and you could easily end up breaking it. Try and get a 4 to 5 mm engineers round file with a proper handle on it. 



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A chain saw file would do the job wink



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Like this: http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Suitable-Stihl-etc-Oregon-Chainsaw-File-Holder-3-8-404-5-5mm-7-32-13252-/150687824419?pt=UK_Home_Garden_GardenPowerTools_CA&hash=item2315b1ba23#ht_1474wt_1185 ?



-- Edited by Cubber on Friday 16th of December 2011 01:44:43 PM

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Cheaper without the holder http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/ROUND-CHAINSAW-SAW-CHAIN-FILES-5-5mm-7-32-PACK-3-/120814773490?pt=UK_Home_Garden_GardenPowerTools_CA&hash=item1c211f24f2#ht_1282wt_952



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Think I'd prefer a handle on balance!

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Picky eh?  biggrinbiggrin

Try http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/3-ROUND-CHAINSAW-SAW-CHAIN-FILES-5-5mm-7-32-HANDLE-/140662601851?pt=UK_Home_Garden_GardenPowerTools_CA&hash=item20c024f87b#ht_1282wt_952    

wink



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Cheers Brian, ordered those :)

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Regarding 13/48 or 14/52 and whether there is any difference besides 14/52 being easier on the chain?

I would've thought that 14/52 gives more torque at the back wheel and therefore more trail friendly.

Dave 



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Front and rear brakes had seized on, combination of the pad through pins and the sliders. All greased up and she rolls nicely again. Just waiting on my chain and sprockets now.

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Just thought I'd jump in and ask a quik confirmation question. I am running a 14-52 combo and was wondering how many links I must buy the chain with I think it's 112?? WaS thinking of getting a renthal r3. Thoughts?

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Theres only one easy solution. COUNT!! Just stick a blob of tippex on the first link.

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I run with 14/52 and bought a 116 link R3 chain, only needed to shorten it by a couple of links if my memory serves me right.

I am almost certain the 112 link would be too short. I would play it safe and get the 116 link.

Tip. Try and get your wheel as far away as the adjusters will allow when shortening/fitting the chain, your rubber shocker flap will last longer the furthur the wheel is from it.  



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just got a talon rear 52 and front 14 sprocket set and a renthal r3 chain with 120 links on it. (for some reason it was cheaper then 112-116 link range. )
i can relate to the shocker flap iv already worn through one and the second one is on its way out, which is just a pain.


thanks for the help
aidan

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colin13846 wrote:

I run with 14/52 and bought a 116 link R3 chain, only needed to shorten it by a couple of links if my memory serves me right.

I am almost certain the 112 link would be too short. I would play it safe and get the 116 link.

Tip. Try and get your wheel as far away as the adjusters will allow when shortening/fitting the chain, your rubber shocker flap will last longer the furthur the wheel is from it.  


 Finally got round to tackling this job this afternoon, unfortunately I got the winter vomiting virus and was puking up constantly and not eating for 5 days (all of last week). Managed to get a roast dinner down me at lunchtime so tackled this job...

Everything went nice and smoothly but I had an intteruption as an old boy from the estate came by extremely lost and disorientated/upset. Turns out he has alzheimers and didn't even know where he lived/that he still had a wife. Packed all my tools/bikes away and managed to walk him home!


By the time I got on it again, I pretty much finished the job but haven't got the clip on the master link yet as I lost the light and have no power in my garage.


My 112 link chain is more than long enough, with the adjusters parrallell with the swing arm right now there is still way too much slack.

I was wondering as a general rule, what number on the snails should the adjusters be on with a fresh chain? Obviously nowhere near 1 because the shock flap will disintegrate, but don't want to use too much of the adjustment up to allow a bit of chain stretch later on.

Will get the master link on tomorrow morning and finish the job.



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Thanks, Bricktop, I was wondering who it was who got me home today........... confuse   biggrin

If your axle ends up mid way along the adjustment slot then it would, IMO, be satisfactory.

As long as the axle nut is done up tightly then really the axle will be well safe at the rear extreme - but it doesn't allow any further chain adjustment without removing links. blankstare

You could always remove the rubber flap until your tyre wears a little and the chain has survived the bedding in adjustment, then replace the flap.

Martyn



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Brick_Top wrote:


My 112 link chain is more than long enough, with the adjusters parrallell with the swing arm right now there is still way too much slack.


If your on a 14/52 sprocket set up I cannot work how a 112 link chain is still way to slack. As stated in earlier post I have 14/52 and only took 3 links max out of a 116 link R3 chain. Cannot work this out unless I have got something wrong???

 

 



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What can I say? The only thing I've not done is checked the number of links on the chain against the 112 link chain I ordered, but seeing as the wheel isn't right at the shock flap and I've adjusted it out a fair bit, and i still have a fair bit of slack either your calculations are wrong or I have a longer chain than I ordered?

All will be revealed in the light of day tomorrow!

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Well job finished, it was a 112 link chain. With 40-50mm of slack on the bottom run of the chain the wheel is pretty much central and on number 11.5 adjuster if I remember correctly.

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Couple of photos...


Would you guys say 40-50mm of chain slack is OK on these bikes (with no weight on the seat).

 

 



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According to the manual it suggests that 40-50mm slack is a tad loose.

The correct slack is between 35-50mm and I reckon that the closer you get to 35mm the better - the chain will "give" when it is used a few times which means that if you set it nearer 50mm it would need re-adjusting that bit sooner. wink

When I first got my TTR I thought that the chain was megga loose. I'd only ever had road bikes and based my guesstimate accordingly. disbelief

My chain lasted about a week before the rollers broke and dropped off - I had set it too tightly - so my 35mm suggestion may need to be taken with a pinch of salt. smile

Martyn

 



-- Edited by Cubber on Monday 9th of January 2012 07:24:44 PM

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That's the thing, I come from a road biased biking background but when you think about it the travel of suspension at full swing arm extension and full compression is going to tighten the chain a fair bit, I think with offroad chains you are better off on the loose side rather than the tight side, don't want to be knackering the counter shaft bearings or ripping up wheel bearings, or stretching my new chain for no reason!

I think I'll leave it be and keep an eye on it, I've no problem with adjusting it again fairly soon.

Next step is to get an MOT, some tax, renew my TRF membership and then I'm finally riding dirt again! :D

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When running a loose chain, you need to make sure your upper chain roller and swing arm chain slider are both in good order.

Brian 



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They are in very good order. Do you think my chain looks on the loose side Brian?

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Nothing like putting me on the spot biggrin

Your pic shows the chain "relaxed" on both the top and bottom runs. I have a feeling that if you had it on the stand in gear and turned the rear wheel such that all the slack was at the top then you may find it looks a bit looser.

I test mine by putting the TTR in gear and then leaning over the bike with all my weight on it (to put the suspension under as much pressure as I can) and see what the slack looks like then. If it is tight at that point then I will slacken the chain to suit.

Brian



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Fair enough, well it is 'in spec' at ~40mm play on the bottom run (with the top run tight), and will tighten a little more with my weight on it, so will just keep an eye on it and adjust to suit

Just a pain as Ive pressed the clip link on and it's a bitch to get it off again in order to take links out of the chain, could have done with a 110 link really.



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Finaly got around to attaching my new chain and sprockets. Was a bit disapionted as 112 links was just to long I had it on the max snail knotch and it was only just within specification. So had to shorten down to 110 which is going to eat my mud guard. Hopefully the chain will stretch a bit because at the moment the snails are on 6.

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