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RE: Resurrection of a scrapheap '02 TTR
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The parts from TotallyTTRs were sent immediately. 6 Star service. Plus, they send an email to say the order had been received. Then another one to confirm it's been sent. And a third to tell me the tracking number.

I do hope that is how they've set up an automatic system rather than having someone sort the information and send individual messages. My local shop, whom I've been dealing with for 20 years, can't even pull up my 'phone number. They should be able to search every part inquiry, purchase, part number, return, swap, refund etc that I've had. Must be frustrating for the blokes on the counter.

What happens after it's dropped off at the post office, well that's Royal Mail & Australia Post.
I did some research via AP. There are 3 types of air mail for packages. Express, normal & economy.

AP's website told me that the Express delivery guarantee was not being honoured. All economy post was stopped. Everything else got onto aircraft as and when it could. I suppose I expected mail would be taken in freight aircraft and there would be no huge reason why freight aircraft volume would be greatly disrupted. Seems loads of airmail goes onto passenger aircraft. There's the reason for the delay.

I also chucked in a query about the package. Just two minutes ago I got an email saying it's to be delivered today. Good news.


Re the rear spring pre-load. Given that I'm no lightweight and, I often ride with gear, I've taken a punt and wound it about 50% down the thread. The shock is still on the garage floor. Swingarm still has to be returned to the frame. I've been a bit de-motivated over the past week or two.

 

Hope to be back rolling along by the end of the week.  Needed that motivation.



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In the Riverina.

'73 RD250, '76 RD400, '80 XS1100, '81 RD373LC, '96 Tiger 900/sidecar, '02 TTR250, '00 Sprint ST and another XS11 - this time a chain drive Period 5 race bike that may be ready to race in early '22.



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Finally got a decent ride in.  Wagga, Howlong, Conago, Wanganella, Conargo, Corowa, Wagga Wagga.

The virus restrictions here mean that I can't cross into Victoria without self isolating for 2 weeks when I come back.  That's because Victoria is viewed as a hot spot by NSW government.  Despite that, there is a border 'bubble'.  My home is about 50km north of the bubble. A Victorian mate, Uncle Gra', lives inside the bubble, in Victoria.  He's allowed to cross into NSW, provided he stays inside the bubble, and go home.  Just needs to fill out an on-line form and display it.

Graham plotted out a route and rolled it onto his roller.  Every back track, channel track, farm track & long paddock he could find, that kept us off the bitumen.

It worked mostly.  He made a couple of errors on his notes and then a coupe of errors reading his notes.  My Zumo kept a track log while I just followed along.

Having filled up at Howlong, we expected we'd need to refuel at Conargo, there being no more fuel on the route until we ended up in Corowa.

Best laid plans of mice....

20201021_164155.jpg

Graham not getting anything at Conargo.  The store is being renovated.  No fuel.

20201021_164207.jpg

The bowsers were dry.

 

 



-- Edited by tripodtiger on Saturday 24th of October 2020 01:15:11 AM

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In the Riverina.

'73 RD250, '76 RD400, '80 XS1100, '81 RD373LC, '96 Tiger 900/sidecar, '02 TTR250, '00 Sprint ST and another XS11 - this time a chain drive Period 5 race bike that may be ready to race in early '22.



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Well at least you got out, good on ya...we will all remember 2020 for various reasons

Terry

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Getting late in the arvo by now.  Riding into the sunset I was wishing for a peak on my helmet.  The soil turns black, which is impassable when it's wet.  It was dry after recent rain and the wheel tracks were reflective.  At one point I dragged my foot down to confirm that it was dry before I rode of the edge back into the track.

 

The fuel issue wasn't resolved by the time we reached Wanganella for a feed, a beer, a camp and a sleep. 

Billabong Creek is the longest creek in the southern hemisphere.  Commences on the northern side of Woomargama National Park, near Wantagong then flows west through places like Walbunderie, Jerilderie, Conargo & Wanganella, joining up with the Edward River at Moulamein.  See how you Europeans like pronouncing those names.

20201021_202831.jpg

An our road building authorities persist in aligning the reflective signs directly back at approaching drivers.  So bright it's really difficult to see past them at night.  Not good if there happens to be a 'roo or a cow wandering on the road just past the sign as you approach.

There was just Graham and I and a couple in their 'van at the van park.  Well, it's a paddock with the water and power at various sites plus a shower & toilet.  Pretty quiet.  We wandered the couple of hundred metres, over the bridge, to the store for a meal and some beers.  Unfortunately I had to drink that pale stuff that seems to be most popular.  It's arguable that Toohey's Old is the best dark beer over here (Cooper's Dark maybe better.  White Rabbit is better but it's a craft beer, so exxie).  I have to say, some of the dark ales and Porters in Europe are just so much better.  Anyway, off track.  Wondering when I'm going to be able to get back there.

The store owners were fantastic.  They seemed to appreciate the lifestyle / business that comes with a remote store.  Normal hours are 9 to 7.  We'd said we'd be back but didn't arrive until 6.45.  No matter.  We got a cooked meal and some beers and they sat with us, having a red or three until nearly 9pm. 

Breakfast in the morning at 9.30 and we just chatted until about 11am.  It's just really good to not worry about what time it is.  And to chat to someone different.  And watch the gorgeous young baby doll girl wandering to an from her 'cruiser in her short dress and riding boots.  I was distracted.  No photos, fellas.  Graham said we're too old for all that.  True.  Pity.  ("For the first three quarters, I wasn't even born")

I'd been getting about 330-350km to a tank up to this point.  The difference was I was following Graham, who just potters along and doesn't twist the throttle that much.  When I looked inside the tank, after 200km, it was still more than half full.    Graham had 2 litres left after he filled from his jerry cans.  Keep that for 'ron, Justin Case.  

Pulled up looking over a billabong off Billabong Creek just for a squiz.  There looked to be ample opportunity to get off the track for some stealth camping.  There is no traffic about, as the road is just across the paddocks through farms.   Really easy riding.  Just keep your eyes up because there are a few cattle grids with turns immediately afterwards.  Suggested that you get up on the pegs to try and see past the grid.  They are always elevated over the surrounding ground level.

20201022_111851.jpg

We had a fairly long discussion about fuel, going back to Deniliquin or not, there being no fuel on the route, making a diversion to Finley or whatever.  Still, there seemed to be plenty left in the tank.  Decision was made to just press on and see what happened.

Interesting thing then was that we were only 15k from Deni when Gra' turned east, following his sheets.

Really interesting from then on.  More turns than a pig on a spit.  We were heading generally south of east.  That meant heading north, south and, I'm pretty certain, west.  But fun gravel and natural terrain soil.  Even a bit of mud from a leaky irrigation channel.  Both hating the thought of mud, we went around it through the scrub. 

A couple of the tracks, signposted 'road', were so over grown that you could barely see the twin track.  Actually, they were the most fun as they tended to wind through the trees, making the ride more interesting.  It was most interesting when Graham dived from the left track to the right track and basically stopped in a sand drift.  Fortunately I ride a good distance behind.  Unfortunately, I'd just got on the gas to get through the sand. I did miss him.  It wasn't pretty.  I hope it's on my gopro.

 

Kept riding, waiting for it to run onto reserve.  Which it did at 441km.  We threw the couple of litres in and that got me another 25 or so on the main (so it was more like a litre).  Back onto reserve and still 40 or so km to Corowa.  By the time we got there, I was weaving from side to side to pick up fuel.  Lunch at 4'oclock to quiet the worms.

Another job is to find out where 'empty' is and measure and mark the tank.

Graham went back to the covid ridden 'DanLand' (Victoria - Australians will get the joke. And its a joke, don't get annoyed) and I figured I just have to slab it home.

 

I didn't however.  I had a wonderful ride up some connecting back tracks through the vicinity of Brocklesby, Goombargana, Walbunderie and Henty, including a really quick run up Ryan Stock Route.  Somewhat sadly, I couldn't say that I went past Burrumbuttock on this trip.

 

That's about it.  I did slab it the final 60k from Henty, given that it was getting late again and I'm loath to clobber skip at any point, let alone on a back road whilst on my bike.

I did get some beautiful views, only stopping for a couple of quick snaps.  Mainly for the green, which is different to how it's been the past few years.

turned.jpg

20201022_173931.jpg

Now it needs the filter cleaned and an oil change. 4000km is probably too far.  I'll be doing them at 3000 from now on.

 

Someone can tell me how to rotate the photo.  There is no rotation button in the 'edit photo' pop up.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



-- Edited by tripodtiger on Saturday 24th of October 2020 02:20:37 AM



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In the Riverina.

'73 RD250, '76 RD400, '80 XS1100, '81 RD373LC, '96 Tiger 900/sidecar, '02 TTR250, '00 Sprint ST and another XS11 - this time a chain drive Period 5 race bike that may be ready to race in early '22.



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Great ride report and photos.

 

Great to see the green returning. Nature is very resilient.

Loving your Ozzy place names. Talking of which a Zoom quiz question last week identified that France has six villages called Silly, 12 called Billy, and two called Pratt biggrinbiggrinbiggrin

Brian



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I enjoyed reading that, save for Ron Later-on! love that sayingbiggrinbiggrin

Thanks for postingsmile

 



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TTRfan wrote:
 Talking of which a Zoom quiz question last week identified that France has six villages called Silly, 12 called Billy, and two called Pratt biggrinbiggrinbiggrin

Brian


 

 

That's a really funny sentence. 



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In the Riverina.

'73 RD250, '76 RD400, '80 XS1100, '81 RD373LC, '96 Tiger 900/sidecar, '02 TTR250, '00 Sprint ST and another XS11 - this time a chain drive Period 5 race bike that may be ready to race in early '22.



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Finally, finally, finally - I've confirmed that the clatter was the chain on the upper guider roller.

I found some time between the other bikes to go back to it, rather than just try and ignore it. 

Some time ago, I put on a roller from some motocross bike.  Didn't seem to change the noise at all.  Then the plastic wheels disintegrated and I was left with the bearings sitting on the bolt.

I pulled the bolt out and replaced it with a piece of aluminium, set a bit higher and extending back to the frame over the swingarm pivot.  Yep, the noise was present but different and the aluminium very quickly got some score marks in it.

20210202_145058.jpg

 

The aluminium thing got pulled and I went from 50T to 47T on the rear sprocket.  Peace at last.

 

Fresh oil & filter, clean air filter, new tyres.  Missed out on a weekend away 'cause it was predicted to belt down and blow.  It did.

 

 

 

 



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In the Riverina.

'73 RD250, '76 RD400, '80 XS1100, '81 RD373LC, '96 Tiger 900/sidecar, '02 TTR250, '00 Sprint ST and another XS11 - this time a chain drive Period 5 race bike that may be ready to race in early '22.



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Why does noone ever believe me?
Glad you've confirmed it. I agree it sounds like terminal engine death rattle sometimes!

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I'll have to scroll back through and find out when you actually told me to look at the top roller set up.

 

Since my last time here I've had another bit of a ride.  2k to Mt Gambier and back for the Historic Master of Mac Park meeting.  I really like Mac Park, this was the first time I've been there without the historic race bikes in a trailer.  2 days each way and 2 days for the meeting. 

Really good ride, once I passed Tocumwal and got into the Millewa Forest along the Murray River.  Not been there in over 20 years, after spending several months going there routinely as part of a team investigating a triple murder (I'm sufficiently over it all now to openly admit my previous occupation, that's a good sign).  I always new there was good riding through there.  Just not much good photography or videos - it's just trees.

Slabbed it again to Elmore (Vic), where I went to the wrong place for lunch.  We waited for each other, separated by 200m.  I even rode past him, looked straight past his 701, did a ewey, then rode past again to the bakery.  He didn't ring, just rode up about 10 minutes later.

Really good route with lots of everything.  Including some deepish sand.  I've always avoided it, as much as possible.  By the time we got to Mt Gambier, I reckon I was going through it quite well.  It proved, if it was required, that steg pegz are a great thing that I should make for it.

Packed up for day 2.  The trees are a brilliant colour.

P1070842 (2).JPG

 

We bumped into the 'Back Roads' television show crew, at Rapunyap.  Unc was star struck by Heather Ewitt.

20210226_100516-1.jpg

A school memorial.

20210301_144659 (2).jpg

On the north western side of The Grampians.

P1070848 (2).JPG

 

We followed Unc's road book, that he made from Rally Navigator.  At least until he missed a turn or whatever and I used my Zumo to find out where we were and how to get back onto his route.  Bitumen where we couldn't avoid it, lots of gravel roads, sunlight & dust in our eyes, some winding hilly bits, over grown fire trails and long disused road reserves that only once ended up with a locked gate.

 

 

 



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In the Riverina.

'73 RD250, '76 RD400, '80 XS1100, '81 RD373LC, '96 Tiger 900/sidecar, '02 TTR250, '00 Sprint ST and another XS11 - this time a chain drive Period 5 race bike that may be ready to race in early '22.



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By the time I got home, the rear shock was dead.  Riding on the spring only.  Boing, Boing.  It's visible in some of the video I took. Even though the quality of the video is pretty poor.  Did I put the link on the video threads?  I can't recall at the moment.

Anyway, the boing, boing broke the bottom off the air box.  It only stayed there because the airbox lid held it there.  I only discovered it when I pulled the rear shock out to send it away for rebuild.

I have used the heat gun to do a repair.  I cleaned up each side of the fracture and widened the outer edge into a V, wide enough for the filler rod.

20210412_155431.jpg

First go, I didn't get enough heat into the filler rod and I was able to pull it apart.

Second go, I made sure that I rotated the rod so that it heated up properly before pushing it into the gap.  Seems to have worked.

Gadget sent me an old one, from his spares.  That's the one that I will clean up and stick in, rather than using the repaired one.

 

I got the rear shock back.  Putting it in was a bit of an effort, as was re-fitting the rear wheel, such that I really strained my back.  It's been over a week and my back is getting towards satisfactory, so that I can finish the job.

Oh, I've gone back to 15:50 gearing as 15:47 was just a bit too tall to hold 6th on the open road.

 



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In the Riverina.

'73 RD250, '76 RD400, '80 XS1100, '81 RD373LC, '96 Tiger 900/sidecar, '02 TTR250, '00 Sprint ST and another XS11 - this time a chain drive Period 5 race bike that may be ready to race in early '22.



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Me and Fogorin near the end of page 2

I've been toying with the idea of a "What's the source of that rattle?" thread for a while!

Looked like a great ride out, except for the shock shock! Did something actually hit the airbox? Nice bit of welding!

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