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Some help please!
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Hey guys,

 

At the moment, I don't own a TTR but I've been very impressed by all the reviews. Actually, I should point out at this stage, that I've never owned a motorbike at all before, nor even sat on one! For that reason, I would definitely prefer to get a small bike and as I'm clueless with regards to engines, I'd like as simple and reliable a bike as possible.

 

All of that, seemed to fit exactly with what the TTR offers. Reliability, simplicity, not too heavy etc..

 

That being said, I do have a few questions and I hope you guys can help me out.

 

Basically, the trip myself and two friends are planning will be from England to Australia. That's a huge trip, and I wanted to know whether the TTR is capable of it? I know it won't be the fastest bike but I'm happy taking my time to get there, as long as the bike can do 10 hours a day with few problems.

 

I know this answer will vary but what kind of MPG do you guys get? Is it high? That's also a key factor, so I'm hoping that it's around the 80mpg mark.

 

Not wanting to bore you or seem too cheeky, I'll leave my post here before I come back asking more questions! I hope you guys can help me out though. This seems to be a fantastic community, so I'm hoping to find some confirmation that the TTR really is the bike for me.

 

Happy New Year, everyone.

 

Thanks,

Jack 



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The mileage is round about 80 mpg, and I would assume you are looking at a ttr250 because you might be riding on some rough ground.
The TTR is very reliable if looked after and it is a comfortable enduro bike and 10 hours a day should be easier for the bike than the rider.
The air cooled engine means even less maintenance so from what you have said about your journey the TTR would certainly fit the bill for a steady long journey, bearing in mind you would need to do a few engine services along the way oil/filtres etc.

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Hi Jack

There seems to be a bit of a move towards using smaller capacity bikes for these adventures.

Lois Pryce is perhaps the most famous TTR250 overlander - see http://ttr250.activeboard.com/t43815972/lois-pryces-2006-trans-africa-adventure/

I also know Robin Webb who does a lot of adventure riding on his TTR250. He has ridden in Morocco, the Sahara, and S Africa and I have a copy of the Salt & Gold DVD which was filmed by Austin Vince and includes Robin on his TTR as one of the riders. See http://ttr250.activeboard.com/t43816852/robin-webbs-salt-and-gold-adventure-in-2009/

The TTR ticks these boxes - single cylinder, air cooled, simple to work on and get spares for wink

Brian



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Exeter, Devon, UK

http://www.ttr250.com  - The one and only dedicated TTR250 FAQ! 
 

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Awesome, guys, thanks a lot to both of you.

I just have one further question, as I'm really confident in what you both said: How easy are parts to get hold of? It's something TTRFan mentioned in that last line and it was definitely a positive thing to hear. Are they readily available?

Thanks for both replies, anyway! It means a lot when you really don't have much experience.

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As you are in the UK, new parts are readily available from your local Yamaha dealer else by mail order from MotoWard or Fowlers. Occasionally a part isn't in stock and has to be ordered from Europe or in extreme cases Japan.

Almost every part is available second-hand at a big saving where a new part isn't essential.

Good quality after-market consumables like filters, levers, chain & sprockets, wheel bearings & seals, gasket sets, bearing kits, spark plugs, seat covers, decals, etc. are readily available via eBay or a certain other specialist TTR250 supplier.

Also there is a growing range of after-market goodies such as bash plates, handguards, exhaust systems, disc guards, frame guards, lowering links, handlebars and risers, etc. available for both the white and blue TTRs. 

Also, I don't think there has been a question from an owner that, between us here, we haven't been able to answer wink

My advice is to buy the best basic TTR that you can (and that can be of any age) but concentrate on the engine to make sure the starter mechanism sounds sweet with no graunching noises and it doesn't smoke or use oil.

The gearboxes and clutches rarely give trouble in my experience.

Good luck. Let us know what you decide!

Brian



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http://www.ttr250.com  - The one and only dedicated TTR250 FAQ! 
 

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DC


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TTRfan wrote:

readily available via eBay or a certain other specialist TTR250 supplier.


 

And between him and his wife provide an absoluetly fantastic friendly service, not to mention a briliant website...don't they TTRfan!!



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Paul, Surrey UK.  

TTROOKIES.  Three Blokes. Three TTRs.  All the gear and no idea.



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It's a big step from never having used a bike before to taking one halfway round the world.
You'll maybe want to learn to ride off road a little.
10 hours a day is quite, not sure what the best word is, optimistic maybe. Look at real world people that have done big long distance trips ( NOT Charlie & Ewan!!) think Nick Saunders and Mondo Enduro for realistically whats possible without support crew. The mondo enduro daily mileages and schedules are worth considering

Whatever bike you might end up with, the TTR is todays DR in terms of simplicity and versatility remember over a lot of your route there's going to be other owners

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That's great to hear someone else is taking a TTR halfway around the world. I'll be leaving Aussie very soon and heading to UK on mine. A lot of people think I'm nuts going on a 250cc. Not me though. Less is more! Maybe we'll cross paths

Good luck.

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Welcome to the long distance TTR section, Fishernz. biggrin

You obviously have much faith in the trusty TTR and its capabilities, and your own.

If you do cross paths in your epic journeys I'm sure you will have loads of notes and lots of talking and advice to pass on.

I wish you luck, and the same to Smokin87 and friends too.

Martyn



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