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Simpson Desert, Australia
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Planning on doing the Simpson Desert in the second half of this year.

Never been out there.

Anyone here done it on a TTR?

A very competent friend, with direct experience of many trips across the Simpson, reckons he struggled on a DR250 compared with any DR650, that did it easily.  Extra grunt to get out of trouble and help the front end up on the sand.  He's not been there a few years but, west to east, says the first 1/3 is all sand with low dunes.  The middle third has larger dunes separated by clay pans and the final third is bigger dunes with wider clay pans.

West to east has long shallower climbs, the tracks having twists and turns leading to the crest.

East to west has steeper climbs but, the tracks are reasonably straight to the top.  So I'm led to believe.

 

Now I'm getting anxious.

Do I keep working on the TTR or just jump ship to a DR650 (or DRz400)?  I have a low km DR that may be available that is essentially ready to go.  Just have to get some spare bearings and seals for the trip.

Estimating 35litres of petrol. 15 litres of water. Tools, oil, spares, tent, ground sheet & sleeping bag. Some clothing and 4 days food.

Going to use D606 tyres.  There is a rim lock in the rear but none in the front.  I read that many use about 12psi in their tyres.  Will the front need a rim lock at such low pressures & will the rear need two.

The gearing I currently have is 15:50 (3.33).  Big sprockets with the expectation that the front can be reduced to 14 or 13 much faster than the rear can go to 52.  And easier to carry.  Going to see what 14  (14:50 = 3.571) does in the hope that I don't need to go to 13 as I reckon that's very tight turning for the chain.  S'pose 14:52 (3.714) v 13:50 (3.846) is an option too.

 

I'd like to get into the sand in western Victoria for a bit of training, plus the Flinders Classic in May for some more.  Next week it's to Phillip Island via the hills north east of Melbourne, to see what I've forgotten over the past 5 years.

 



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In the Riverina.

'73 RD250, '76 RD400, '80 XS1100, '81 RD373LC, '96 Tiger 900/sidecar, '02 TTR250



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Riding with Tom has done it on a WR250R so it would be possible, fuel range would be the biggest issue

Terry

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TT-R250 & WR250R for dirty fun

Triumph Thruxton for the twisties

Triumph Scrambler for fun

 YOUTUBE channel https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCPSstOEnd2NSu0Va6kt2ySg



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I was just thinking of Riding with tom's youtube channel when I scrolled down and saw Terry got there first. Gives you a good idea of what it'll be like. I think the TTR will cope. Keep it as light as possible.
Low pressures will definitely need rim locks, although I used Tubliss in Algeria which worked brilliantly. Sometimes down to zero psi, but that's a bit excessive! 2 locks in the rear would probably help keep the tyre on the rim all the way round and reduce sand getting inside and wearing the tube. Don't use ultra heavy duty tubes - at really low pressures they roll up and do nasty things.
14/50 or 14/52 gearing should be fine I think. Getting moving in the sand involves spinning up the rear wheel, rather than needing low ratios like you need for technical rocky stuff. Going too low I think you will feel like changing up a gear just at the point you start to get moving. Robin Webb is the most experienced desert rider I know, and he has come back to 14/44 - stock - for many trips. He has also been 325 big-bored as well though, which helps.
You are so fortunate to have so many desert options in your home country (I know your distances are huge, but you don't have to worry about ferrys, visas, or crazy beards in HiLuxes with gpmgs bolted in the back!)

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I have both a TTR & WRR & I think the TTR is easier to ride in the sand, the engine is a little better down low, however the TTR uses more fuel than the WRR. You need a long range tank but tanks listed for XR400's will fit with simple modifications or TTR R US should be able to supply a fitting kit.

Terry

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TT-R250 & WR250R for dirty fun

Triumph Thruxton for the twisties

Triumph Scrambler for fun

 YOUTUBE channel https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCPSstOEnd2NSu0Va6kt2ySg



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400k range with the Acerbis tank, on road.
I've got 1 5 litre fuel bladder, so far.
Reckon another 5 litre bladder will cover the range.

This biggest stopper for this proposed ride is still me. My shoulders and wrists aren't all that great. We'll see.
Making it two nights in the desert will help.

Time will tell.

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In the Riverina.

'73 RD250, '76 RD400, '80 XS1100, '81 RD373LC, '96 Tiger 900/sidecar, '02 TTR250



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Have had mates do it but with back up 4wd and trailer carrying fuel food tents swags spares etc. So you can ride light just carry a camel back use small tanks and refuel out of jerries fairly easy that way. Its actually on my bucket list.
Crossing carrying all your own fuel water food and gear is obviously a whole lot tougher . TTR should do it though.
I'd consider a sprocket change from the highway trip up to the actual desert crossing.

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Kaos wrote:

Have had mates do it but with back up 4wd and trailer carrying fuel food tents swags spares etc. So you can ride light just carry a camel back use small tanks and refuel out of jerries fairly easy that way. Its actually on my bucket list.
Crossing carrying all your own fuel water food and gear is obviously a whole lot tougher . TTR should do it though.
I'd consider a sprocket change from the highway trip up to the actual desert crossing.


 Agree 

Best way to do it 



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I think this will be unsupported. Despite living in a country town, I don't know anyone that goes out in 4wd that wouldn't want to be part of the trip on their bike. One benefit of back up is if the bike carks it. Recovery is expensive. Very.

Sprocket change is a given. What ratio? remains the question. Some time out near Nhil may help.

I spoke with my friend the other night. Be ready for 3 nights in the desert. No rush, take it easy on the body.


Time will tell.


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In the Riverina.

'73 RD250, '76 RD400, '80 XS1100, '81 RD373LC, '96 Tiger 900/sidecar, '02 TTR250



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Whats your back sprocket size, you could go a 14/15 front on the highway up, 13T across the Simpson.

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Kaos wrote:

Whats your back sprocket size, you could go a 14/15 front on the highway up, 13T across the Simpson.


 Good suggestion also pack a spare lock tab 

It's sandy but only three days enjoy 



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