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Post Info TOPIC: Scottoiler
Lin


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Scottoiler
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Anybody had any experience fitting a Scottoiler to a TTR250?



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RE: Scotttoiler
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One of our Devon riders (Bob) has fitted a home-made "Scottoiler" to his TTR and leaves his tell-tale markings everywhere he stops. smile

His effort certainly lubricates his chain but only when he squirts the trigger on his supply reservoir (oil can). It works well and lubricates an often ignored component.

A "Scottoiler" is a cleverer bit of kit. It lubricates the chain as the engine runs. A vacuum pipe is connected to the inlet track and this opens and closes a valve in a regulator that suplies oil directly to the chain from a reservoir. confuse

The kit is relatively easy to fit and usually works very well once it's adjusted. I've got one fitted to my road bike.
If it is regulated well and kept filled then it certainly extends chain and sprocket life. On my Bandit 1200 it has been used for over four years and I've only adjusted the chain a couple of times. aww

I can only assume that fitting the kit to a TTR would be comparatively simple because there's stacks of room under either side panel to secrete the reservoir and meter and attaching the supply pipe t the swinging arm would be dead easy. The quill dispensing head would easily fit somewhere arond the bottom chain guide also.

Yes - go for it and report on your findings for us all. biggrin

Martyn



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East Budleigh. Devon



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RE: Scottoiler
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I have a Scottoiler on mine. The vacuum take off is from the little screw hole on the right hand side of the carb. I think it came with the right little brass spigot in the kit but I can't swear to it. It must have. I don't remember it being a problem. I mounted the reservoir up by the tool kit as high up as I could by bradawling two holes in the plastic back there and using a couple of cable ties. Suspension bounce musn't let the wheel rub the reservoir, obviously. Routed the pipe down the removable frame rail, wiggle round the front of the swinging arm with enough slack for suspension travel. Not much as that's the pivot point. then down the underside of the swinging arm to the chain guide and pointed it from there with the bits and bobs in the kit. The toughest bit was getting it pointed just right so it didn't knarl up if wheel went backwards. On the road it's fine but needs checking from time to time off road as it's easily moved by twigs and stuff but usually springs back. The vacuum pipe just runs down the right side frame to the carb. the routing of that is less crucial as it doesn't drop any oil any where if it gets nipped but make sure it can't foul the throttle. shouldn't do. it's on the other side.

I love Scottoilers. Well, that's not true, but I really hate chain maintenance. Most common problem is setting the rate too fast. The chain doesn't need to be wet looking. just like it has seen some oil in living memory.

It won't mean you don't need to wash it after a muddy run but the oil isn't super claggy like regular chain lube so it washes off fairly easily and takes the grit with it.

I've heard it said that if you're thinking of desert trails on it, you might want to consider no oil at all but this does mean you have to sacrifice the chain on a regular basis and considering the summer we've had, I don't think we're likely to experience those sort of conditions anytime soon.

Andy

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Lin


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Thank you Martyn and Andy. Especially for the information on the vacuum port in the carb, as the bikes are in the Philippines and I am in New Zealand it is good to know this before I commit to buying two Scottoilers.

There are two versions of the Scottoiler - a vacuum driven version and an electric version with an electronic controller. I think we will go with the vacuum version.

There is a very good parts website and from here I have located the screw Andy mentions:

http://www.boats.net/parts/search/Yamaha/Motorcycle/2006/TT-R250%20-%20TTR250V/CARBURETOR/parts.html



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Lin


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Ok, I bought the Scottoilers.  As you say Andy there is a little brass fitting in the kit (well, two actually) that are used as the vacuum supply. I emailed Scottoiler in Glasgow and their technical support bloke very kindly emailed me some pics of a unit installed on a TTR along with some helpful instructions.  

RMV.JPG

 

Dispenser and tube routing.JPG



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I am guessing the pics are of a TTR600 Lin. It would be interesting to see how the Scottoiler looks fitted to a TTR250 when you have done the job wink



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Lin


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Yes I think you are right, it's a TTR600, but the general idea is presented.  I think the location of the Scottoiler unit on a TTR250 will be different and Andy's contribution on this is very informative.  I won't be fitting them myself, I'm in NZ and our TTRs are in Cebu City in the Philippines where my brother lives.  

We have a rather amazing local mechanic (Randy) who will fit them.  To digress a little, for forum members light entertainment I include some pics of Randy's old Honda.  Amazingly this guy has equipped his bike with his own design of home-made hydrogen generator.  Built it himself out of materials he could scrounge locally.  He just pours water into the tank, starts it up on petrol then switches to hydrogen.  Damn thing runs like a clock....

photo0014.jpg

photo0019.jpg

photo0017.jpg



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If this is correct it's amazing!
Ask Randy if he would tell us his method.I would certainly give it a go.

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Lin


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It's correct - I have seen it in operation with him riding it.  As far as I understand it's employing electrolysis to generate the hydrogen, a well understood technology and commercially available.  Note the massive AC gen he has added to the left side case to supply sufficient current to the system.  What is surprising is Randy's ingenuity using bits and pieces he has picked up to manufacture it. 



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