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New TTR owner ready to rock and roll
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Hi Guys and gals. Just bought a 2003 Blue plastic tank model off Gumtree. Never owned one before but I've been a biker since before I had a licence and I've owned a multitude of Yamaha's since I was sixteen (Fizzie, Tenere, YDS5, FJR600, several TDM's - 900's and 850's - and currently own a '97 TDM 850 which recently took me to Southern Spain and back without even breaking a sweat)

Rode the little blue beastie 70 miles home and started to feel like an eighteen year old again. It appears to be bog standard with only 4,500 miles on the clock (speedo didn't work when I got it so that mileage is debatable) Anyway, it ran pretty good bar a few stalls here and there. The plucky little engine felt a bit lumpy at low revs but it handled incredibly well on the road with those knobblies and it DID get me home and with a big grin on my face - result!

Stripped it down to find the two bolts that should hold the top of the engine to the frame were completely missing, so slipped a couple in. The speedo drive on the front wheel needed a bit of TLC but it works now. The oil seal behind the front sprocket is leaking oil when the bike is left running on the side-stand but stops leaking when it's upright, so that'll need replacing (any advice on how to do that without stripping the engine apart would be appreciated) Other than that it's pretty good.

I reckon the engine has a lot more poke to offer than it's currently producing - feels a bit out of breath, so I'm going to replace the standard exhaust system with a short header pipe and mega, shorten the air box snorkel, fit a K&N filter and up the jets sizes to suit, fit a 13 tooth front sprocket after changing the oil seal then get it dyno'd and then go and find some fields to plow!

My daughter's boyfriend owns a WR250 and he's been egging me on for ages to get a dirt bike. He's half my age and rides his bike like someone half my age would - flat out! I won't go into how old I am, suffice to say I have four Grandchildren. However, there's life in this ol' dog yet and I've got 25 years on him in terms of experience, so watch this space. I'll show him a thing or two (or maybe not - it has been a while since I've dug the dirt on a trailie) I'll let you know how I get on - hopefully not from a hospital bed!   



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Well done, Graham, getting a TTR - not for admitting you started on a Fizzie! biggrinbiggrin

Welcome to TTR land

For all your problems with the TTR you can use the Search button in the middle of the actions bar at the top of the page

As far as age is concerned don't fret - there are quite a few on the forum older than you. wink

You're only as old as you feel but the older you get the less you bounce.

Martyn



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Welcome to the forum Graham - and for an amusing introduction - I needed something to smile at on this dull grey Monday morning wink

You may already have found all the self-help items here http://ttr250.activeboard.com/f604245/repair-and-maintenance-quotstickiesquot/

It includes an item on renovating the front speedo drive - see http://ttr250.activeboard.com/t58825906/speedo-drive-rebuild-blue-ttrs-only/

If you want any original OEM used or new parts then TTR Steve is your man - a regular on here and runs the ever-helpful Totally TTRs emporium biggrin

It has been a while since I replaced a sprocket oil seal but my recollection is that you strip off the front sprocket and hook the old one out, clean the shaft and housing up and press a new one in. I would recommend fitting an OEM seal  as it isn't a job you want to do again too soon. You can fit a new 13 tooth sprocket at the same time but don't forget to buy a spare tab washer if yours has had both sides already used. I wouldn't recommend using the same tab again no

Brian



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Cubber wrote:

Well done, Graham, getting a TTR - not for admitting you started on a Fizzie! biggrinbiggrin


I confess to starting my 2-wheel adventures on a Lambretta Martyn. Ended up having quite a few - best way to keep your sharp mod clothing clean compared to riding those dirty motorbike thingies biggrin



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Thanks for the friendly response guys. I didn't actually start off on a Fizzie. That was my first "road legal" bike. I was blatting around on a 500cc AJS for a coupla years before that (B roads, no speed cameras then - know what I mean evileye) But that was a long time ago.

Two strokes hey Cubber? - you either love em or hate 'em. I was going to get a Husky trail bike then I saw the TTR and thought better of it. I've had a few smokers in my time - just recently restored a couple of very early Kwacker H1's (see pics) Noisy, smokey but a barrel of fun, if you can keep the carbs in synch. I fitted reed valves to the white one which made it rideable. The TDM I just love - heaps of grunt, utterly reliable and sounds like a B52 bomber on takeoff.



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Welcome to the forum Graham

Nice pictures of your bikes, but we all would like to see the TTR.

Your parts will be in the post today and when I know the cost I will sort out if you have anything in credit, I am posting all in one box first class signed for.

Steve

Edited bit........Ps thanks for the orders





-- Edited by ttr steve on Monday 11th of December 2017 12:06:20 PM

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Opps, sorry forgot. Here's my TTR



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TTRfan wrote:
I confess to starting my 2-wheel adventures on a Lambretta Martyn. Ended up having quite a few - best way to keep your sharp mod clothing clean compared to riding those dirty motorbike thingies biggrin

 

So did I, Brian.  redface.gif

My Lambretta was a 1954 LD 150 with shaft drive and torsion bar rear suspension. I could guarantee coming off the thing at least once a week - scraping the silencer as it was so low.

Lambretta LD July 1966.jpg

Martyn



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Is that a Black and White photo? My kids have trouble believing there was ever even Black and White TV!!!

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Ha ha the whole world used to black and white before everything magically changed to colour sometime in the 1970's. Before that everything was black and white.   Something to do with the ozone layer and greenhouse gasses.

TV and photos became colour as well shortly afterwards.

My kids don't believe me either, but hey the proof is in the photos.



-- Edited by Kaos on Monday 11th of December 2017 10:21:41 PM

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And we can remember life before the internet and the mobile phoneno Kids would not know what to do without them.



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Well, I took the little blue beastie out for it's first serious trail ride today with my daughter's boyfriend leading the way on his WR and showing me the trails he rides around the West Sussex areas, and I have to say I wasn't disappointed.

Beforehand, I'd fitted  a few of the parts I'd ordered from Totally TTR's, i.e. a shorty header pipe & some really neat shorty clutch and brake levers. I also fitted an iridium spark plug and cleaned the existing standard foam air filter as well as fitting a set of heated grips I bought from M&P. I'd bought a 13 tooth front sprocket but I decided to leave the standard 14/44 sprockets on to see how they worked out.

Ten minutes into the offroad section and I was off! Ahead of me, I saw Paul nearly bin his WR as he went straight through a really deep puddle, well it wasn't really a puddle. It was a flooded crater the entire width of the track and about 2ft deep. The only way forward was through it. He managed it but I didn't. The front wheel of the TTR slid sideways and I couldn't hold it. Over I went - headfirst into the freezing cold muddy water. Fortunately the bike careered the other way and ended up at the bottom of a slippery grass ditch. With my boots filled with water (freezing cold water I might add) I dragged myself out, sopping wet. The bike fared better than me. At least it was dry! It fired up first prod of the starter button and after wheelspining through a ploughed field I managed to get back onto the track off we went again.

I really was really glad I'd fitted those heated grips. By now, Paul's fingers were numb from the cold. Mine were encased in soggy wet gloves but my hands were toasty warm.

A bit further on and we were chewing through some really wet and muddy narrow tracks and I was all over the place trying to keep up with Paul. The rear wheel was spinning and the front had a mind of it's own. Another deep rut flipped me off and I was dumped into a thick pile of soggy mud. Up again and off through more ruts and seriously slippy furrows I was starting to feel a bit worse for wear. The terrain got worse and the bike was a nightmare to keep upright. The front wheel just wouldn't behave itself and the rear felt like a slick. I realized those nice little enduro tyres the bike came with when I bought it just weren't up to the job. They were fine for road riding but this was a different world altogether. I made a mental note to change them for a set of serious knobblies before I tried this route again.

It also became apparent that the 14/44 gearing was a tad too high. I'll be fitting a 13/48 setup after today's escapades. The plucky little engine managed ok but on the really knarly sections it needed a bit more get up and go to get through the really tricky bits. The tyres were definitely ****e and made it really hard work on the very slippery sections. 

Paul then got a puncture 3 hours into the ride and that was that. He filled the rear tyre up with foam and limped home with me keeping an eye on his back wheel in case it came off. It didn't and we made it back ok.

All in all today was a barrel of fun despite two off's, a thorough soaking for me and a puncture for Paul. I loved the TTR. It's a great little bike. With a set of knobblies, better gearing, maybe a set of bar risers, I reckon I'll be able to keep up with my mad daughters boyfriend and perhaps even manage to stay on it.

So, to summarize, I learned a lot on that first little venture into the wild. The shorty header pipe made quite a noticeable difference to the torque of the engine mid range. The shorty levers made the bike much easier to control. The iridium spark plug really smoothed out the engine, and the heated grips - wow - they were a godsend. I'd have frostbite now if I hadn't fitted them. The tyres are definitely crap for really wet and muddy work and the gearing needs a tweak. Even with the standard airflow the engine is a peach and it seemed to get better as the ride progressed for some reason. Maybe it was it's first angry ride for some time and any errant cobwebs that were in there got blown out. Maybe I was just enjoying it more as we went. I don't know and don't really care. I'm definitely going to ache tomorrow, I know that. I haven't exercised my arms that much for quite a while. That was a lotta fun.  



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Great ride report - thanks for writing it up!  biggrinbiggrinbiggrin

Everyone has their own idea about tyres but in muddy conditions you will find the Mitas C02 rear and Michelin Comp IV front combination hard to beat!

Brian



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RE tyres, not a fan of mud at all & to be honest we don't get a lot here in South Australia but some of the summer tracks I use will be muddy & wet clay in winter, I have been using Dunlop D606 tyres on the TTR & as they come in 120/90 - 18 it's a taller tyre so I fitted a 13T front sprocket & it keeps it close to OEM gearing.

I have been using MT21 tyres on the WRR, using a 120/80 -18 same size as the OEM tyre, also comes in 120/90 -18 as well, the MT21's are much better than the D606 as far a grip goes & I got 3000kms from the rear which is pretty good for me.

Terry

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+1 for the Mitas C02 in mud! I trail ride up and around Northamptonshire, all we have is mud! Thick and sloppy, got some photos of Dan stuck in huge ruts it's that bad and the C02 are brilliant!

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Mitas CO2 the Stone King??, isn't that designed for hard terrain and rocks?? I've used them for summer rocky riding, high country trips etc but you guys reckon they go ok in the mud.??

I used to always run medium Dunlops, I could get them pretty cheap but it was false economy they wore out too fast.

Now I usually run Bridgestones MX tyres, the medium X30. They are a bit expensive but seem to last longer. They hook up as well as anything but seem to keep a good edge for a while. Over winter I run the soft front.   They have a very stiff sidewall so can go pretty low pressures in the mud.

Might have to have another think on the Mitas.

PS I avoid riding on bitumen so full off road tyres for me.



-- Edited by Kaos on Saturday 16th of December 2017 09:52:42 PM

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I prefer fast dry trail and hilly woods to be honest. Did a lot of that twenty or so years ago. The tyres I have on the bike now would be great for that. Thick mud ruts is just bloody hard work however that's what it's like this time of year in England so, hey ho, off we go!

I've got thick/thin Contour bars and want to raise them a bit so I can stand on the bike without stooping which will probably give me a bit better control in the mud. Looking at fitting a set of Pirelli Scorpions.

Jeez I ache! These old bones and muscles had quite a workout the other day.



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Welcome to the forum Big G wink

I'e got Powermadd 2 inch risers on my bike. Love them. I didn't need longer cables with them as I flipped the throttle cable. I can take a couple of pictures if you'd like if that doesn't make sense. 

I got them from https://procycle.us/bikepages/dr650.html#controls I prefer the powermadd risers to rox risers or cheap riser blocks as they are stronger in a bingle as they are one piece and you can move them fore and aft to get a perfect fit. I have mine fully forward. 



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