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Oh no - not another refurb by Brian!! Yep - this one is a 2005 official UK import.
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Just when you thought it was safe, I have started another refurb wink

Frame and loom.jpg

As usual, ICS at Cullompton did a great job on the powder coating and I have so far loose-fitted the wiring loom plus rec/reg, coil and solenoid. I am trying to recall the best order in which to fit the parts and think it's linkage and swing arm next followed by steering yokes and forks to help keep the frame stable. 

We have had a few queries in the past about how the solenoid fits so here is a pic showing its location without it being obscured by other parts:

Solenoid fitted.jpg

Brian



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I thought I would start slow and simple with the ignition switch and steering lock wink

These are the components which had been stripped out of the frame before it went off for powder coating:

Ignition switch fitting 1.jpg

If you haven't already got a note of the key number then now is the chance to read the number off the black tape on the ignition barrel. You have to move it around in the light until it can be read. 

This is where the ignition barrel is gonna go:

Ignition switch fitting 2.jpg

First install the large rubber grommet on the RHS and then push the ignition barrel through. Secure it with the black plastic cap and its torx screw not forgetting to clip the wire under its retaining clip.

Pic of LHS:

Ignition switch fitting 3.jpg

The steering lock slips into its housing in the unlocked position. Once in, lock it to stop the spring popping it back out again! The cover can then be fixed back in place by tapping back in the retaining pin and its tiny washer.

Pic of RHS:

Ignition switch fitting 4.jpg

Job done - said it was simple biggrin

Brian

 



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OK - before I get distracted onto any more "nice" jobs I am going to have to do the linkage and swing arm next.

Quite a few to choose from! I usually try and keep all the parts that come off a TTR, when I strip it down, together but I had a tidy up after some building work and I have lost track of which of the swing arms belonged to this bike. No matter as I am going to replace the swing arm and linkage bearing and seals in any case. The number of swing arms in that stack reminds me of how many TTRs I have broken for spares over the years blankstare

Swing arm 001.jpg

 

I chose one where the chain slider was worn but had not started to chew into the bearing cover or the arm itself. I also wanted one where the bearings needed replacing and this one fitted the bill perfectly!

Swing arm 002.jpg

 

Caught this chain slider just in time before the chain could do more damage!

Swing arm 003.jpg

 

Proof that even a swing arm that looks pretty much OK on the outside can still be bad on the inside:

Swing arm 004.jpg

 

I stripped off the hose holders and then used a piece of threaded bar to drive out the shaft on the top link arm to save damaging the threads:

Swing arm 005.jpg

Swing arm 007.jpg

 

Too late here to start the power washer up and annoy the neighbours so I have left the swing arm outside in the rain to soften up the dirt ready for power washing.

To be continued.........



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I might just head over with a camp bed, gonk bag and a flask to watch this one. I'll be no trouble guvnor, you just crack on..!

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Speedo mount needed....
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I could always use a hand Jason wink

Looking ahead, I know I am going to need a speedo mount as in the pic below. Rather have the genuine TTR article than go with the Serow option again. Anyone got one for sale or know of one for sale please?

Brian

Part needed.jpg



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RE: Oh no - not another refurb by Brian!! Yep - this one is a 2005 official UK import.
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I love a refurb thread. I think one of these times you should go crazy though and do a matt black all over stealth TTR, or a fully chromed one...

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Previously Yamaha YBR125, Yamaha TY125, Yamaha TY250



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Hi Pete - still thinking of doing a "John Player" special - black and gold.

John_Player_Special_F1_car.jpg?m=1325524530



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OK - made some progress.

Cleaned up the linkage arms and fitted new bearings and seals - guide here. Same with the swing arm - guide here. Had problems getting one of the bearings out of the swing arm but persevered and, with a bit of heat, got it out.

Fitted the linkage arm and torqued up the bolt whilst it was easily accessible.

Swing arm 008.jpg

 

Swing arm cleaned, sprayed with silver wheel paint (tough stuff!), and fitted with new bearings/seals, chain slider and decals.

Swing arm 009.jpg

 

After fitting the swing arm into the frame, it was easier to fit the linkage arm to it with the frame on its side.

Swing arm 010.jpg

 

Some progress now with the swing arm fitted but it makes the frame unsteady on the stand so I may just pop the wheel in to weight it down!

Swing arm 012.jpg

 

To be continued.....................



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DO THE JOHN PLAYER SPECIAL!!! I would sell my wife and child for one of those

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'54 plate Suzuki GSF 650S (Bandit)

Previously Yamaha YBR125, Yamaha TY125, Yamaha TY250



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Very entertaining Where's that popcorn.......!

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Do you have any of the "retainers" for sale for the ends of the swing arm Brian? Mine is missing them, not sure if that's critical or not hmm

 

PS Looking really good ! smile



-- Edited by WheelMan on Monday 1st of September 2014 09:30:58 AM

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I am reluctant to take the retainers off any of the swing arms as I hope to refurbish them to sell at a later stage.

They are not madly expensive new. A tad under £7 for two ends and 4 screws.

The part number for the end part is 4GY-22177-00 and 98517-05010 for the screws. 

Brian



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Thanks Brian, where is the best place to get them?

Could you possibly give me a link to somewhere on line?

Thanks again, Mike

PS Ignore that, just ordered the ends from Fowlers (haing found some advice you gave someone else smile )

Their data base came up with "circlip - £999.99" for the screw part number though smile 



-- Edited by WheelMan on Monday 1st of September 2014 10:31:25 AM

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WheelMan wrote:

PS Ignore that, just ordered the ends from Fowlers (having found some advice you gave someone else smile )

Their data base came up with "circlip - £999.99" for the screw part number though smile 


 That's odd - I have an online ordering facility with Fowlers and it just let me add them confuse



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Made a bit more progress. I was hampered by a lower head bearing race that didn't want to come out! So far all the bearings etc that I have replaced have been the originals so they have had 9 years to "bed in" thus making life just that bit more interesting (difficult!) for me no

The top bearing race was in perfect condition as is often the case but, over the years, moisture can gather on the bottom race and cause wear. This wear was obvious visually but you could also feel the "waves" where it had worn so it had to be replaced.

Steering yoke 001.jpg

 

I have a special removal tool but its a bit tricky to use on the TTR because the steering lock protrudes into the frame making life a bit awkward. However, with perseverance and a big hammer I got the offending part out!

Steering yoke 002.jpg

 

Although I have done the job quite a few times, I always have to check with the workshop manual that I am putting the washers etc back in the right order.

Steering yoke 003.jpg

 

At last, the steering yokes are fitted. Just have to remember to torque up the steering head nut once I have fitted the forks - which is my next job.

Steering yoke 004.jpg

 

You will see in the above pic where the powder coaters mask the frame number. Even so it is still very faint after shot blasting. I have given it a few coats of clear lacquer and, once that was thoroughly dry, I put a piece of tough sticky backed clear plastic over the top to stop any further wear from cables and leads.

As I said, forks next............

Brian



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Today was fork day!

Cleaned up the forks and checked the stanchions were straight and no problems with the chrome. The forks had a good action but my guess is that they still have the original oil in them. I don't want to disturb the fork seals or internals but just change the oil so have started to experiment with a spare fork leg.

First off, clamp the leg into the yokes to stop the stanchion turning when undoing the cap nut but BEFORE you start to do that, let any air pressure off through the Schrader valve by taking off the cover and depressing the valve core stem. This one had some air in and, if I hadn't done this, I would have had an oily mess as the cap loosened.

Fork oil change 1.jpg

 

The cap came off easily.

Fork oil change 2.jpg

 

It was then a case of putting down some newspaper (I seem to have problems with draining fork oil and usually end up with a few ceecees in my shoes disbelief ) and draining the oil off into a suitable container.

Fork oil change 3.jpg

 

I have left the fork to drain and will be interested to measure what came out to see how it compares to the recommended 550cc! 

If I was actually going to use that fork, once fully drained, I would upright it and pour or syringe in 550cc of new fork oil before screwing the cap back on and fitting it on the TTR.

Before I do the same with the forks that are going on my project bike, can anyone see any flaws in the plan?

Brian



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Is it the actual millilitres of oil that's important or the distance from the top of the fluid level to the rim? I've read somewhere (i thunk it was in my BMW manual) that the volume is s guide but you should measure the distance and ensure its equal.

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Thanks for the reply Simon.

On the TTR you start off by putting in the 550cc of fork oil and then adjust the level both sides to 130mm - see here and scroll down the page.

However, that level is with the spring out so I plan on putting in the 550cc of fork oil and then seeing if it is possible to get the levels the same in each fork - whatever that level might be.

I am banking on the new oil improving the fork action whatever wink

Brian

PS Thinking about it, it wouldn't be difficult to take the cap off and spring out and fill to the 130mm level confuse  

PPS I will look again tomorrow.



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*fully* draining forks - not an easy job - in my experience it seems to need an awful lot of pumping and inverting etc to get all the oil out of the damping mechanism.

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Point taken brindabella!

I managed to drain nearly 550cc of oil out of each leg which was a good sign. The oil from one fork was pretty clean so maybe an oil seal had been changed at some stage.  The oil from the other was a bit manky indicating it was probably the original.

Fork oil change 4.jpg

 

In order to do a better job, I decided to dismantle the forks further to properly drain and flush the forks plus adjust the oil level as per the manual.

This involved pushing down the spring collar to be able to get a spanner in and then taking off the cap.

Fork oil change 5.jpg

 

Once the spring was out, I rinsed out the forks with clean fork oil and drained them again. I then poured in 550cc of fresh Silkolene fork oil. I used 7 weight as the original oil is so thin it is almost as if there is no damping. What is slightly annoying is that 2 x 550cc = 1.1 litre and the fork oil comes in 1 litre bottles cry

Fork oil change 6.jpg

 

I use a screwdriver with a zip tie set at 130cm to check and adjust the oil level. The red wire is there to feed the spring over at a later stage. That said, I found it was too thick and had to resort to thin wire instead.

Fork oil change 7.jpg

 

Trish came out to take the pics and decided to take one of my mess. I did say that I always end up with fork oil all over the place disbelief

Fork oil change 8.jpg

 

I then pumped the inner rod as per the manual to get the air out and within a few strokes you feel quite a resistance indicating the oil has reached the right places biggrin

I fed the spring, collar and and spring seats over the damper rod and pulled the rod up through with the wire. It was then just a case of reversing the dismantling process and screwing the cap onto the rod whilst holding the nut with a spanner. Then lifting the inner tube up over the spring and screwing the cap down into it.

A bit of a clean up and the forks are read for a new set of gaiters and fitting to the yokes wink

Fork oil change 9.jpg

 

In conclusion, it is a fairly straightforward job to refresh fork oil without the palaver involved with changing seals.

Brian

 



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As usual Brian, great thread!



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Fitting shock absorber
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Thanks Michael. I am struggling to find things that I haven't shown many times before!

On the agenda for the last couple of days (between grandkid sitting!) was cleaning up and fitting the shock absorber.

It cleaned up very well and the damper rod and bump stop are in good condition but one of the top bearing collars had a piece missing. These collars are amazingly brittle and delicate so be careful with them. They are also expensive (just under £11 each!).

I drove the broken collar out with a sharp punch and hammer.

Shock absorber 1.jpg 

 

This is what the old and new collars look like. The felt seal was in good condition so was re-used.

Shock absorber 2.jpg

 

It was then a simple job to fit the shock absorber remembering to put the top bolt through from the LH side so that, if need be, it can be removed in the future without disturbing the battery box.

Shock absorber 3.jpg

 

I haven't fully fitted the reservoir as it will need to be moved out of the way to allow the engine to be fitted.

Shock absorber 4.jpg

 

Not sure what next. Probably the rear brake whilst there is lots of clear space to fit it. Maybe get the wheels and tyres sorted as well.

Brian

 

 



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Oh no - not another refurb by Brian!! Yep - this one is a 2005 official UK import.
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The rear brake caliper etc is in and working. It may seem insignificant but its another step along the way!

First off I had to find it! Fortunately it was in good condition and just needed cleaning up.

I split the caliper and cleaned up the slide pins and rubbers and put it back together with new grease.

The piston is moving freely and the pads look new.

The caliper pins came out relatively easy and just needed some surface rust removing before being put back in with some copper grease to help keep things moving.

Rear brake.jpg

Wheels, tyres and axles tomorrow - probably....

Brian



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Wheels and tyres
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Wheels and tyres sorted!

New Pirelli MT43 trials tyre on the rear wheel and a new Michelin AC10 on the front.

Still need to fit a new sprocket on the rear and sort out a speedo drive for the front before fitting.

Wheels and tyres.jpg



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RE: Oh no - not another refurb by Brian!! Yep - this one is a 2005 official UK import.
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The speedo drive on the TTR looked a bit manky so I stripped it out and rebuilt it.

The photo below shows the parts involved and I am pretty sure the drive can't be dismantled further. If anyone else knows different please say! 

I have included in the photo a brand new drive for interest.

Fit the parts in order starting from left to right i.e. plain washer, gear, tab washer, plain washer and, finally, circlip.

Speedo_drive1.jpg

 

Having stripped out the gear make sure that it is as clean inside as possible and make sure that the worm gear turns easily. Use a small electrical screwdriver or similar and use it as shown in the photo.

The photo sequence below shows the build. Sorry about the grease but I always get in a mess playing with grease and oil disbelief

Speedo_drive2.jpg

Speedo_drive3.jpg

Speedo_drive4.jpg

Speedo_drive5.jpg

Speedo_drive6.jpg

 

Once it's all together make sure that the gear rotates freely in an anti-clockwise direction. I use a screwdriver to spin it on one of the tabs.

Speedo_drive7.jpg

 

I can now fit the front wheel.

I have fitted a new sprocket on the rear wheel and that is in the swingarm so I will soon have a rolling chassis biggrin

Brian



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Great thread thanks for sharing.



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"And now I can fit the front wheel" - well that didn't go as planned. I fitted the speedo drive onto the wheel and hooked the wheel up between the forks and only then noticed there wasn't a lug on the fork for the speedo drive housing to slot into. Neither was there a  locating peg for the cable clamp at the top of the leg. disbelief

Fork leg 1.jpg

 

Somewhere along the line the original forks got separated and I picked up one from a digital speedo model without the speedo fixings. This also explains why the oil from the RH fork leg was a lot dirtier than from the LH one when I drained them back along. I got over 500cc out of the correct fork leg and it was pretty clean which was encouraging. Didn't take long to put in the fresh oil, adjust the level and put everything back together. 

The picture below shows the difference between the metal-tanked fork legs and the later blue models with the cable-driven speedo.

Fork leg 2.jpg

 

Hopefully I can now get the front wheel back in properly biggrin

 



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Another forking happy day tomorrow, then? biggrin

Look before you leap - I doubt if I'd have said anything. no

Martyn



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Don't mind admitting my mistakes Martyn smile

The upside to it is that it means that I now have a nice fork leg for sale that fits a TTR with a digital speedo biggrinbiggrin

Something that I realise I need (where did the original go???) is a speedo cable clamp that holds the speedo cable to the top of the lower fork leg as in the photo below. Can anyone help me out for an appropriate amount of beer tokens please?

Speedo cable clamp.jpg



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Having recovered my confidence after the fork trauma I decided that the next job would be to fit the engine whilst the engine bay is relatively free of clutter.

I rebuilt an engine for this project TTR a while ago and have been testing and running it in (first oversize new piston fitted etc) in my unrestored runabout TTR.

Fitting engine 1.jpg

 

Quite a lot of stuff to disconnect or remove but its a relatively quick job. This is the engine ready to take out.

Fitting engine 2.jpg

Fitting engine 3.jpg

 

I have found the engine lifts out the easiest from the RH side with a bit of a lift to free it from the frame mountings and leaning it slightly forward whilst swivelling the front outwards.

Fitting engine 4.jpg

 

One man job - a few seconds more and its out biggrin

Fitting engine 5.jpg

 

The next stage is a bit lengthier and involves a deep clean and respray to smarten it up.

The frame on the runabout looks in really good condition except that the previous owner has re-painted parts of it (badly) in black no

Whilst I have so much stripped off I might go the whole way and strip it down to the frame and get it shot blasted and powder coated. Need to keep busy  wink

To be continued.......

Brian



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I like your refurb threads Brian.

with all your experience, I wonder if you are one of those people who eventually
get sick of workshop clutter and all the fancy different brands and categories of grease, cleaners, lubricants etc,
and have worked out a nice set of useful stuff which is the minimum economical set to do most things.

If so, I am sure we could all benefit from your knowledge of which greases etc are "good enough".

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TTRfan wrote:

The next stage is a bit lengthier and involves a deep clean and respray to smarten it up.

The frame on the runabout looks in really good condition except that the previous owner has re-painted parts of it (badly) in black no

Whilst I have so much stripped off I might go the whole way and strip it down to the frame and get it shot blasted and powder coated. Need to keep busy  wink

To be continued.......

Brian

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________

 

Made me feel guilty Brian cry
I'm hammeriting mine at the mo, and badly too, as I just don't have the time to strip it all down and paint it properly. hmm
At least it won't go more rusty though smile and next year I can take it all apart and give it a better job.....

 



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That wasn't meant to make anyone feel guilty Mike - sorry disbelief

However, I stripped out the frame of the donor TTR this morning ready for shot blasting and powder coating and this is what it looked like before power washing it. Hope it makes you feel better wink

Frame 1.jpg

Frame 2.jpg

Frame 3.jpg



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brindabella wrote:

I like your refurb threads Brian.

with all your experience, I wonder if you are one of those people who eventually
get sick of workshop clutter and all the fancy different brands and categories of grease, cleaners, lubricants etc,
and have worked out a nice set of useful stuff which is the minimum economical set to do most things.

If so, I am sure we could all benefit from your knowledge of which greases etc are "good enough".


Thanks for the feedback - much appreciated. I just hope the threads get too boring and repetitive!

I like the idea of starting a thread on "proven/economical/useful workshop consumables". If I start off with my UK thoughts maybe other owners from USA, Australia, etc, can weigh in with their local equivalent brands......



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The engine is now ready to fit into the frame. I seem to have made a meal of it this time and it took ages. Possibly because I kept sidetracking myself by nipping down to the garage to do a bit more stripping on out the donor bike's frame no

Fitting engine 011.jpg

 

It is worth mentioning again that the clutch actuating arm can find itself on the wrong side of a frame bracket if left to its own devices so I always wire it tight to the cable support as shown in the pic below. Saves lifting the engine up and struggling to get the arm back into the right position  - I know all about that!

Also wire the stator and neutral switch cables forward out of harms way.

Fitting engine 012.jpg

 

Another tip is to hang the carb overflow and RH breather pipe over the swing arm before fitting the engine. Saves a difficult job later wink

Fitting engine 013.jpg



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Having seen the project in the flesh on Friday now, I can really say that you are doing a great job with it Brian!

Thanks for all your advice, and the bits that I came away with smile

Also, please thank Trish for the cracking sandwiches !

Hope the winter preparations will soon be finished so that you can get back on the TTR stuf wink



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It was great to meet you Mark! It was my secret pickle that perked up the cheese sandwich wink

Winter prep just about done but I have been a bit distracted by car problems - not all mine no

Anyways up, what's happening on the refurb?

Internal bearing puller 002.jpg

 

Gone backwards! When I torqued up the swing arm it felt very stiff as if it was binding somewhere. I put the wheel on and tried it off the stand hoping that a bit of bouncing would see it free up but, no, still very stiff.

So the swing arm had to come out again to examine what was occurring. The internal bearing shaft was very tight on the RH bearing and I am sure that was the cause of the binding. 

I had ordered one of these bearing pullers to test out and it was delivered this morning smile

So it was a good opportunity to test the puller by removing the new swing arm bearing. I am delighted to say that the puller worked brilliantly biggrinbiggrinbiggrin

Internal bearing puller 001.jpg

 

The bearing came out intact and undamaged even though it was VERY tight in its housing. This puller is going to earn its corn!

When I had got the bearing out I could see the problem but only just. I had difficulty in removing a very stubborn old bearing on this side and there is some very slight damage on the housing which I am sure has caused the problem by pushing in the bearing shell slightly. I have to work out now how to get the housing clean again without ovalling it.

More to follow.



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Problem solved.

I put a 19mm socket on the end of a short extension bar, wrapped it in 120 grit paper and soon identified the high spot - which was equally quickly removed! The bearing then pulled in nicely and I could turn the bearing shaft by hand.

I bolted the swing arm back in and torqued it up and the swing arm now moves freely, not loose but not rigid as before. I am happy now biggrin

Swing arm bearing easing.jpg



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Gordon D. = Gordon Dalgarno confuse

I took him over Squabmoor a few times and each time he commented how he enjoyed it (oo er)  wink

Martyn



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The frame of the "donor" TTR I mentioned back along (and appears in the pics having its engine removed) came back very quickly from the powder coaters and before I had gotten around to fitting the engine in the original refurb frame.

The "donor" TTR is also a 2005 model and slightly newer plus it is taxed and MOTd plus the engine is the one shown in its V5 registration document.

It made sense to me to put the engine in its correct frame and it was an easy job to swap over the swing arm and forks from the other frame so that's what I have done!

Having made the switch over, I fitted some of the peripherals including the battery box and a new battery. Before putting these in, I added some sticky-backed aluminium foil to the underside of the battery box to act as a heat shield plus I did my usual modification the the terminal nuts by slipping in some pipe underneath to keep them in place when removing the battery.

Battery terminals.jpg

 

The TTR then looked like this:

Engine in 002.jpg

Engine in 003.jpg

 

I had limited time left before the grandsons arrived for tea and an overnight so just had time to fit a new front mudguard.

Engine in 004.jpg

Engine in 006.jpg

 

The frame I was originally using still has the loom, rec/reg, coil, solenoid and steering yokes fitted and I hope it will be a quick build when I have finished on building "the other" - pictured below:

Engine in 005.jpg

 

Handlebars, switch gear, clutch perch/cable, brake reservoir/lever/caliper, speedo, grips and handguards next.

Brian



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 Is that a new loom..??!!



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Nope - the original loom cleaned up very nicely biggrin



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TTRfan wrote:

Nope - the original loom cleaned up very nicely biggrin

 Come on..divulge..what magic potion..??!!



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TFR, cleaning brushes and pressure washer - plus wet feet cry

Finished off by blowing out the connectors with a high pressure airline (surprising how much extra dirt that gets out!) and spraying all the connectors with electrical contact spray wink



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You are very welcome any time Jason! What might have fooled you is that I have fitted new headlight connectors as the previous owner had fitted an after-market headlight and had chopped off the original connectors.

All the switch, lever and brake gear that came off the donor bike is in very good condition so just needed a good clean up before checking over and fitting. Here it all is having a dry off in the fresh air:

Handlebar gear 1.jpg

 

The switches are in great shape and they were working fine only a few weeks ago so I just need to take the backs off and blow them out on the airline before giving them a spray of contact cleaner and fitting them.

Handlebar gear 2.jpg

 

I use open-ended grips on my TTRs when I am going to fit handguards because I have never managed to get a neat finish when cutting off the ends disbelief

Handlebar gear 003.jpg

 

Trish was out so I borrowed her hair spray which makes fitting the new grips a doddle - smells nice as well! It doesn't take long to evaporate (not sure how it does that through the rubber!) and leave the grips on tight.

Handlebar gear 005.jpg

 

Once the throttle, clutch and speedo cables were dry, I treated them to a dose of 3-IN-ONE oil by hanging them up and gently dripping the oil into the top ends. I then leave them with some newspaper underneath to make sure that the oil goes all the way through.

Handlebar gear 006.jpg

 

Don't forget to put the plastic doughnut on the throttle tube before fitting the grip on that side!

Handlebar gear 008.jpg

 

Getting there:

Handlebar gear 009.jpg

 

A big thank you to Hopper for the speedo cable retainer! Now fitted biggrin

Handlebar gear 010.jpg

 

Next up is the front brake caliper and reservoir - unless I find something more interesting to fit..... 

Brian



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Yep - I got distracted and fitted the horn biggrin

Forgot to mask up the brass contacts before re-spraying it and then had to emery off the new paint from them disbelief

As I have most of the wiring in place now I was able to test it and its working nicely.

Horn.jpg

 

I noticed when fitting the horn that the after-market mudguard was nearly touching the frame and remember that from the last refurb.

Mudguard 001.jpg

 

A simple solution is to pack the rear collars out with washers. I tried putting on washers above the collar and its a pain trying to keep them in place whilst fitting the bolts so this time they are captive.

Mudguard 003.jpg

 

The after-market mudguards (WRF or YZ) don't have the same deep groove to accommodate the wiring loom as the OEM TTR mudguard so its necessary to check there is enough slack to allow full lock without straining the loom. Once bolted up the loom is tight between the yoke and mudguard.

Mudguard 004.jpg

 

Plenty of clearance now!

Mudguard 005.jpg

 

Looking for something in the parts boxes, I realised that there were lots of footpeg bits and pieces left to fit so that's another job on the list for tomorrow wink

 



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RE: Oh no - not another refurb by Brian!! Yep - this one is a 2005 official UK import.
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Slow down...!!

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Don't worry Jason - I still got loads to do wink

Meanwhile all the handlebar gear except the handguards are fitted plus the speedo and front indicators.

Handlebar gear 011.jpg



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Sidestand switch and wiring
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Carb and airbox now fitted! I got fed up with tripping over the airbox so it's better off in the TTR biggrin

I noticed a while back that the block connector on the loom for the sidestand switch was missing so that was my mission for tonight.

The wires and block connector had been cut off and the cut wires soldered together and heat shrinked. Very effective but not as tidy as putting a loop of wire in the block connector so that the connector was still in the loom if someone wanted to fit a sidestand in the future no

Stand switch 002.jpg

 

I had a spare sidestand switch (there wasn't one with the TTR when I bought it) and fitted it with the correct crosshead bolts and wiring clips.

Stand switch 003.jpg

 

I found two bits of wire the right colours (Blue/White and Blue/Yellow) which still had their block connector on. However the heat shrink that was to go over the wires wouldn't fit over the block connector so I took out the terminals. This involves pressing in a little spring tab on the terminals whilst wiggling the terminals back and forth to get them out. Easier once you have done the first one. I have a terminal removal device and used the smallest of the prongs.

Stand switch 004.jpg

 

I cut the wires to a generous length and remembered to put the heat shrink on before twisting up the wires to be joined and soldered.

Stand switch 006.jpg

 

This is where the observant readers will have spotted my mistake already. The terminals are females and should have been males  disbelief 

I could deal with that little issue after soldering the wires together. I spoilt myself to a Pyropen soldering iron/torch a while back and its great at getting heat into the joint quickly. I had problems with the mains ones and used to find myself melting back the insulation on the wires through being on the joint too long.

Stand switch 011.jpg

 

Soldering done and first bit of heat shrink on. Make sure the joints are cool before slipping the heat shrink over them else you can guess what will happen no

Stand switch 012.jpg

 

I then had to cut off the female terminals and fit the males. Nice and easy with the correct pliers.

Stand switch 013.jpg

 

I put the covering length of heat shrink over the two wires and fitted the block connector.

Stand switch 014.jpg

 

Job done!

Sorry if that is a bit basic for most of you but, you never know, it might help someone wink

Brian

 

 

 

 



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RE: Oh no - not another refurb by Brian!! Yep - this one is a 2005 official UK import.
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I tend to shy away from bike electrics but i guess that having a decent selection of connectors, terminals and tools for the job, make it a bit less daunting ?

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