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APC 14-day Rally – 18 May 2013
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See here 

I understand two TTRs are entered. One is Robin Webb's and he is sending his TTR325 over from the UK. Might the other owner be a forum member?

Apologies if you are and have already told us about it - maybe Brindabella or Matt?  I have lots of senior moments disbelief

Brian



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yeah, its me (hard to keep a secret on this forum).
starting at Murrumbateman (an official start point, although not listed).
for me (assuming I don't hit a kangaroo and kill myself in the event) it finishes coincidentally via the Brindabella ranges.

standard bike on this rally is a KTM690. last year there were some pretty big "adventure bikes", but maybe this year not so many as there are more "semi-technical" mountain tracks (apparently optional, but should be fun on the TTR), to complement the various endless corrugated dirt/sand roads etc that make up the 500km plus each day.

bike has 22l tank, with foam packing refurbished the other day.
I intend to fit camping gear and luggage in a giant loop coyote bag slung over the back of the seat and the front of a B and B rack.
KTM bend alloy handlebars, biggest possible barkbuster handguards (VPS, for wind protection).
soft grips and bar end weights,
silly home made plastic bash plate held on by zip ties,
mandatory GPS (garmin montana for me) on ram mount, will be wired to battery,
dunlop 606 tyres, 3mm tubes, 13/47 sprockets from chain gang will be fitted.

bike is otherwise totally standard, I'm not bothering with windscreen or heated grips.
wearing normal riding gear but with plenty of thermal stuff.
shoei hornet helmet (ie with vizor) but with backup goggles.
waterproofs, Spot tracker and day junk in 22l backpack with 3l water bladder.

I'm a bit lazy, so there is lots of preparation still to be done.
trying to practice getting up early (for me) and get fit riding my mountain bike.

wasting some of my spare time (potential bike setup time) by working on a specialized back up android rally map/GPS phone app, for fun and interest.

speaking of senior moments, I dunno, but I guess I could be fairly close to being the oldest participant.

I'll report back on the damage after the event.


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Good luck.

I hope everything goes according to plan for you.

I've been reading the information pack and it seems to be quite daunting (and expensive) for entrants.

Martyn



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Update!

At least three TTRs are entered! Robin Webb from the UK, Brindabella and Rupert Shaw from Australia wink

Robin and Rupert are starting from Wodonga.

Robin is busy prepping his TTR and the pic below shows his spare fuel canister he sourced from Germany - http://www.fuelfriend.de/

 

Robin Webbs TTR with fuel canister.JPG

 



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Any news guys?

I received this pic from Rupert Shaw this morning headed "7,100kms in 14 days with 80% offroad" - he looks pretty pleased with himself - and his TTR wink

Rupert Shaw and TTR.JPG



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That looks superb ! I like that fuel can its much better then HG ones I have



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yeah Brian, some news from me..

I didn't complete the rally (back home on day 10), as my GPS unit popped out of its mount on day 2, and couldn't be found with hours of searching. The GPS is the "sine qua non" in this rally, and as I was not in a group (the other 2 possible starters in my area not starting due to injury), I had nobody to follow so I made slow progress.

However, I did have my own home developed android phone app which was an emergency backup, and had the rally track loaded on it, so I continued with that. This made for slow progress though, because some sections required lots of position checks (as the rally route often went into forestry areas with lots of tracks, and sometimes dived off into "single track"). Instead of just glancing at the GPS unit, as on day 1 and most of day 2, I would have to stop, find neutral, drag the phone out of my pocket, and press a button on the screen to get a fix - but it did work and (with cell radio etc off) consumed very little battery power (it could work for days).

Navigation was also made "interesting" by, eg, a track which went past signs saying "private - locked gate ahead", followed by an apparently locked gate (on a road which had uncertain status as a power line access road coming out of a little trafficked national park via private property), which could, however, be accessed by lifting the locked chain over the gatepost.   

The riding was great - lots of nice tracks, fantastic scenery, some great views, often no other vehicle seen for hours.
some little country pubs were great - eg $20 for a night at Moonan flat, including coffee, breakfast with real milk, room heating and convenient bike parking. It would be a wonderful way for a foreign visitor to see a "different" and beautiful Australia (except for the rushed schedule!).

My TTR, fairly standard and with pretty light load, was easy to ride and confidence inspiring.
The bike showed its abilities in recovering from "hmm, this steep downhill can't be on the route", and "I'll just follow this little track here for a bit".

Slow going due to navigation led to 2 unplanned nights camping out (one with rain), and contributed to hitting a suicidal wallaby one evening - no damage to bike, but same couldn't be said for the wallaby.

In one part of the rally route it rained heavily - over 100mm in 2 days just when I happened to be there. As I had relatives nearby, I wimped out and had an enjoyable 2 days staying with them. Heading off when it cleared, I was never going to finish the whole rally, so I did 3 more sections and then had 2 long days on inland highways to get home early.

THE BIKE AND GEAR

TANK: I already had a 22l acerbis tank mounted, and for the rally I just renewed the foam packing.
There were no issues with the tank, and I can confirm that the spark plug can be removed and replaced using the standard yamaha tube spanner without having to remove the tank (I had a weird starting issue on day 2 and replaced the new plug with the old one that I had for a spare). I first sloshed some water in and blew it with a siphon hose to avoid getting dirt into the cylinder.
My tank is translucent so it is easy to see how much fuel is remaining. The tank uses yamaha rubber bushes in the 2 forward mount points and after a while these wear due to the greater fuel weight but mine have yet to be replaced.

TYRES AND SPROCKETS ETC: Dunlop 606 tyres and 3mm tubes, no problems. I use chain gang sprockets and x ring chain, and as an experiment did absolutely no chain cleaning or lube. after nearly 4000km, no adjustment was needed. I was happy with the 13/47T ratio which gave enough grunt for any difficult slow stuff but would still enable 120kph. I made sure that I added some balance weights when I installed the tyres, and I got a smooth ride on bitumen as a result.

OIL AND AIR FILTER: I topped up the engine oil a couple of times (less than 0.5l total). Air filter was reasonably ok but had a fair bit of dirt accumulated on it near the snorkel intake area.

SUSPENSION: I left it as I had it setup for normal dirt riding without luggage. standard springs and shocks and oil. It was nice and comfy. Bear in mind the bike was not carrying a huge load - ie myself in thermals and full riding gear 70kg plus a backpack weighing 5kg loaded, and a giant loop coyote bag weighing 10kg loaded.

LUGGAGE SYSTEM: I had a coyote saddle bag (heavy duty inverted "U" shaped thing) and this fitted very nicely over the front part of a B and B aluminium rack - because this rack nicely follows the seat/fender contour. For anyone installing this rack, I would advise making sure that all the bolts are tight (wiggling while tightening evenly), and getting it as tight as possible, using loctite and double up on nuts just to be sure, and be sure about the bolt which also holds the muffler. I filed some of the slots in the rack to provide smooth strap routing points and to enable the taillight to be accessed without removing the rack. The coyote bag had back straps that went through the rack, clips that just miraculously fitted into a couple of side slots in the rack, and lower down straps which I ran through brackets I made that bolted onto the pillion peg mount and were retained by a extra jubilee clip. This luggage system was great and they coyote bag could quickly and easily be removed from the bike for overnight. Packing the coyote bag was a bit of an art, but easy enough - eg sleeping bag was put into a dry bag which was bigger than the standard compression bag and allowed the bag to be formed into the right shape to fit nicely. The coyote bag sat worryingly close to the exhaust but no problems. A bit of extra heat tape would not go astray though. The coyote bag left plenty of room for shifting about in the saddle, standing up, footing etc, and I strongly endorse it.

CAMPING STUFF: 1 man tent, torch, lighter, sleeping bag, mat, water, toiletries, spoon, pre mixed oats+milk powder+ dried fruit, random fruit purchased en route. (plus light pants and sandshoes for camp/pub wear)

WEARING: klim goretex jacket, old MX type pants and boots, simple light knee pads (mainly for warmth due to wind protection), wool based socks, couple of layers of thermals, ordinary mx gloves, rubber over mitts (used one day, didn't really like them), plastic pants for rain only, light balaclava/neck warmer, earplugs, shoei hornet helmet (really comfortable - but I wonder if a "pin-lock" anti-fog lens would have been an improvement).

TOOLS AND SPARES CARRIED: I had 3kg of tools in 2 tool rolls, enough to change a tyre, fix or adjust most things, siphon hose, plenty of tape, zip ties, nuts and bolts, string and liquid steel stuff. I carried a normal 21 inch front tube, spare plug, oil filter and chain link.

THE HANDLEBAR AREA: I used an italian made handlebar sold by barkbuster, in a KTM bend (slightly wider and straighter). This meant the clutch positioning was tricky, but there was a sweet spot. I had large barkbuster VPS touring handguards which were great. I had some foam grips. If doing it again (and I'm thinking of next year), I would probably take a "throttle jockey" thing to slip over the throttle grip for the longer days. I had a nice mirror mounted on a RAM ball which screwed into the right hand yamaha mirror bolt - I cant recommend this mount as it just cracked and fell off one day (from bumps/vibration - not crash impact). I replaced the blinkers with smaller ones, although this was more important for the rear blinkers which needed to be relocated to give luggage clearance.
by the way, I have a later model ttr which has the standard 60W headlight which was definitely useful.

GPS: the garmin montana 600 was optimal for this particular rally. apparently they don't often come adrift from the garmin "rugged AMPS" mount, but for me sadly it did! in hindsight, an extra security tether on the unit would be sensible. I wired it to plug which went to a twin wire cable twisted and soldered directly to the yamaha clips that go onto the battery (a tight fit there), with a small fuse near the positive terminal. I had the unit on the steering stem area, although the optimal position would be exactly where the stock speedo is located (hmm, next year maybe remove that speedo and replace with gps mount plus bicycle speed/odo?). some riders attach the AMPS mount to the bars via RAM mounts, but these have a habit of becoming loose and needing clamp re-tightening (especially if using the cheaper all plastic RAM components). Also using those RAM mounts means that the front brake cable is a bit close - but maybe if I had used such a mount it would have reduced road shocks? 

ODDS AND ENDS: the bike was remarkably stock. exhaust, carb etc nothing cut off, no "restrictors" removed, just needle one step leaner. performance was fine from sea level to about 1300m (maybe losing a bit of edge by being slightly rich for the very highest altitudes). fuel range was about 17 or 18 km per liter. seat was standard, footpegs standard, no heated grips, no 3rd party bashplate (but a home made plastic one), no accessory number plate holders etc (but some of the standard plastic trimmed back), no windscreen or other rallye adornments. And really, I wouldn't change much if doing it again.

OTHER TTR ENTRANTS: you can get some info by googling or binging "apc rally 2013" and selecting the advridermag forum link. Also lots of rider reports and photos etc. I think Robin Webb must have had a defective spot tracker (a thing which reports your position via satellite every 10 mins, subject to battery and reasonable view of sky). There was some mention of a TTR with a clutch problem (high gearing and steep hills?) and minor tank bracket issues. Speaking of the spot tracker - there's no privacy on the net - on the way home, someone with an interest in next year's rally noticed from the tracker maps that I was heading home probably via his town, and collared me at a service station, and bought me a meal at maccas in exchange for info about the rally.

SOME PHOTOS OF BIKE:

 

apc2013_ttr_side.jpg

 

 

 

apc2013_ttr_bars.jpg

apc2013_ttr_back.jpg

 

 



apc2013_ttr_angled.jpg

 

 



-- Edited by brindabella on Tuesday 11th of June 2013 01:19:16 AM

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Super Guru

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Great feedback. Comprehensive bike details and helpful pics - ta Brindabella biggrin

Is this the same tank as yours?

Brian



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It sure looks like it, Brian (and good value, too). 5.8 US gallons is pretty close to 22 liters.
aha, I just read the ebay page properly - it has identical part number!
the advertised color is natural/clear which is ideal as you can see the fuel level easily.

BTW, in the rally, the fuel range was about 17 or 18 km per liter,
although around town I easily get better than 20kpl.

tank details are at http://ttr250.activeboard.com/t47885054/bigger-tank-installation/

I'll paste the relevant details from that thread below..

MY TANK PURCHASE ($307.79 including $75 international shipping)
https://justgastanks.com/index.php
1 Honda XR250/400R Acerbis Fuel Tank
Option's *Part #/Years/Capacity : 2062480147 96-06 5.8Gal(Natural)
note: last 3 or 4 digits of part number are color code

I reckon there are THREE acerbis tanks that are actually identical except for fittings:

acerbis 22l XR250/400 1996-2003/4
acerbis 22l XR600 1988-1989
acerbis 22l XR650L 1993-1996 (nb NOT XR650R)

For example my tank is supposedly an XR250/400 tank, but it has alternative screw inserts marked as "600 650", "600" and "250" - ie two possible bracket positions and two rear pull down screw fittings.
The supplied honda fittings are all pretty useless - you have to make your own, but the end result is a great fit.


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TTRfan wrote:

Update!

At least three TTRs are entered! Robin Webb from the UK, Brindabella and Rupert Shaw from Australia wink

Robin and Rupert are starting from Wodonga.

Robin is busy prepping his TTR and the pic below shows his spare fuel canister he sourced from Germany - http://www.fuelfriend.de/

 

Robin Webbs TTR with fuel canister.JPG

 


 hey yo!!!!

 

 

what kind of back tyre is this?

 

I know there is no UBER tyre, but mine is VERY hateful on asphalt: loud purr-ring noise at 50 km/h, wobbly at 60 km/h, (it is pretty good in muddy forest  but I have to get there) its a Michelin.

Screenshot_3.jpg

 



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looks like a AC10 Michelin 110/100/18

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