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Shock absorber bushes and bearings
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hi does any know if the bottom bearing kit can be used on the top of the shock absorber any help would be great



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They do fit but will need packing out. There was a thread about it on the old Yahoo forum. Might be worth doing a search over there.

My suggestion is that you use one of Andy's excellent top bush kits. See here

I use these kits and they work well and no more suspension squeaks wink

Brian



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Shock Spring
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Anyone had their shock spring recoated? I'd have thought powdercoat would just crack off, but maybe plastic coating?

Has anyone had it done?

 

Cheers Spud.



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I have asked around and there is some confusion as to what plastic coating is and how it might be different to powder coating.

A CCM owner had his spring powder coated back along and says its fine and no cracking of the paint. Another biker replied that many shock springs were chromed and that didn't seem to be a problem.

Up to you but I think I would go for powder coating as I knwo where to get that done locally wink

Brian



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Well although I id think it would just chip off apparantly powder coating is the way to go. Wish I'd done it before attaching to the bike though.no



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Rear Shock Absorber - Q&A megathread
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Decided to go with powder coating the shock but it looks like the spring will only come of from the bottom. Therefore I need to disconeect the oil chamber.

Does this need to be filled/pressurised to go back on or can I just disconnect, take off the spring and put it all back together again? I can't find any info about it.

 

Cheers Spud.



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Rear Shock
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There is an article on DIY shock repairs here, CLICKY, that may give you guidance on your dilemma.

Beware, though, it's in Russian so you'll have to translate it somehow (Google can do it). confuse

It is a very detailed article and it looks to be a complex job.

Shocking stuff but if you spring into action  you may kill the suspense. biggrin

Good luck,

Martyn



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Thanks, as I thought. The oil will have to be released to get the reserviour off. In itself not an issue but to get it pressured again is a ball**** and an expense I could do without. Anyone tried the refurb servive on ebay?



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I see that the Yorkshire firm will refurbish the TTR rear shock for £100 + p&p - but it doesn't say that it includes re-painting the spring. disbelief

On the other hand, you get a virtually NEW unit for your outlay and it's set up to your requirements. I'm sure they could repaint the spring for a nominal charge. wink

It would save you a whole bunch of hassle and worry.

If mine was farbood then I'd consider their service. After all - it's as Yorkshire as I am, all bar 40 miles. smile

Martyn



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Also see http://ttr250.activeboard.com/t45893091/ttr250-shock-absorber-repairrefurbishmentservice/

Justin is moving his website but can be contacted by phone on 01752 846888

I am sure Justin could also organise painting the spring wink

I must have another look tomorrow but I felt fairly sure that you could get the spring off from the bottom so not losing the gas pressure.

Brian



-- Edited by TTRfan on Friday 25th of May 2012 10:48:12 PM

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Hi Brian, anymore thoughts on taking it apart?  I cracked the pipe nut and got a few drops of oil out. It looked and smelled like thinners not oil. probably the original 20 year old oil. I'm thinking whichever way I do it it's going to be refurbed. On a more stupid note I've managed to buy another Raid off ebay thinking this would only be together by winter at the rate I'm going. Oh well hope it's worth it. Maybe I should have just paid someone to rebuild the whole bike. disbelief



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Rear Shock Absorber - Q&A megathread
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Sorry not to have replied before - slipped my mind disbelief

Had a look earlier and the shock is designed so that you can take of the spring from the "bottom".

The bottom spring retainer is slotted so if you wind the spring right off at the top you should be able to compress it enough to slide out the retainer - hopefully wink

Or use pucca spring compressors - see here.

Shock spring retainer.jpg

 

Brian



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RE: Rear Shock
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I wouldn't recommend undoing the uniion on the remote unless you have a heavy towel or bunch of rags over it, i did one on a Pan couple of years ago and it nearly took my head off plus a high pressure jet of oil . Hopefully the above post sorts it

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Well since I couldn't be bothered to try and do the shock myself I sent it to Gibbs performance to get rebuilt. Great service with a turnaround in a week.

New seal block, oil, gas, a bump stop (which you can't get from Yam) , powdering the spring , postage, labour came to £120.

 

Can't complain at that and recommended if you need the same doing.

 

Cheers Spud.

 



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"Hyperpro Progressive Rear Shock Absorber Spring Yamaha TTR250 04>"
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Interesting - just seen this ad on eBay - the first after-market rear shock spring that I have seen advertised here 

Brian



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1993 OE rear shock absorber questions
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Hi, I have a 1993 TTR250 OE, when looking at the rear shock absorber, it appears that there is a dial on the lower shock shaft above the bottom mounts. Is this to adjust the length of the shock absorber or is it for sometihng different.

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The "dial" you noticed is for adjusting the suspension but not, perhaps, as you presume. wink

I'd advise you to have a look at this article in the FAQ section. SUSPENSION INFO

The knurled adjuster nut is used to adjust the rebound damping and it can be screwed up or down.

Screwing it upwards hardens the rebound damping and screwing down softens the damping.

The standard setting is 8 clicks out.

The minimum adjustment is 16 clicks out.

The maximum adjustment is 1 click out from fully turned in.

Martyn



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More info in the owners manual:

Adjusting rear shock Pt 1.jpg

Adjusting rear shock Pt 2.jpg

Adjusting rear shock Pt 3.jpg



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Rear Shock Spring Wt.
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Does anyone know what the stock (yellow) rear spring wieght is.

I need a heavier spring and think I have found one but before

tearing into it I would like to be certain it is heavier,

Thanks



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Rear Shock Oil
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What is the recommended oil weight, per Yamaha?  Does anyone know?  There is so little info about these bikes, especially here in the US.



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Front is 5W but usually if the back needs oil it means a rebuild is nessesary. Maybe you mean re-gas??

.................

Jarrah.



-- Edited by barra8 on Tuesday 27th of November 2012 06:08:06 AM

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No I do mean oil.  I know N2 goes into the bladder.  I'm in the process of re-valving the shock now.



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Nothing in the workshop manual to help - sorry!

I am very impressed that you are doing your own re-valve. That is several steps farther than most of us owners would take! However, I am sure we would appreciate a few pics and a short explanation of why and what you were doing the revalve for smile

Greywolf used "Castrol Fork Oil Synthetic SAE 10W-universal oil for forks and shock absorbers" on his rebuild - see here. I opened it in Google Chrome which did the translation wink

Good luck

Brian



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suzbandit987 wrote:

No I do mean oil.  I know N2 goes into the bladder.  I'm in the process of re-valving the shock now.


 Oh okay...good work. Can't reccommend anything for the rear as MR YAMAHA kept it a secret wink I have never done this as i sent it in for $300 re-built. It would be interesting to see what is required to do the job. If you can please upload pics & discription of this??

..............

Jarrah.



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I'm almost done.  Don't really have any pics.  If you want to know how to do it, then just follow this: (This DR350 shock is 99.9% indentical to the TTR shock.)

http://www.thumpertalk.com/topic/631120-dr-350-shock-gold-valve-install-with-pictures/

 

Once I get the shims squared away I can post what shims I used.  I put a YZ 250F front end on this bike, because the front forks were ridiculous.  Then after that it showed how weak the rear shock was (mostly in compression) so I decided to beef up the shims.



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suzbandit987 wrote:

I'm almost done.  Don't really have any pics.  If you want to know how to do it, then just follow this: (This DR350 shock is 99.9% indentical to the TTR shock.)

http://www.thumpertalk.com/topic/631120-dr-350-shock-gold-valve-install-with-pictures/

 

Once I get the shims squared away I can post what shims I used.  I put a YZ 250F front end on this bike, because the front forks were ridiculous.  Then after that it showed how weak the rear shock was (mostly in compression) so I decided to beef up the shims.


The TT thread is pretty informative, thanks for the link.

I'm interested in your fork conversion, can you post some info/pics/impressions about that? One of the Oz members here put WR250 forks on his rally bike but ended up changing back to stock, more because of seal issues as I recall. But I don't remember much regarding how they functioned.

 

Thanks, Ted



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I bought a 2003 YZ 250 front end complete, complete, complete!  (this is very important as none of the bits that attach to the TTR front end will attach to the YZ front end other than the fender.)

 

This thread briefly talks about how to get YZ front end on a TTR.  It very easy.  Dremel out of old nut and the rest is literally a bolt on.

http://www.thumpertalk.com/topic/445993-ttr325-reviewreport/



-- Edited by TTRfan on Thursday 20th of December 2012 03:38:04 PM

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OK, here is what I did for the rear shock shim stacks.  I used 7W fork oil.  I'm 190lbs with all of my riding gear on and this shock is now ~90% where it should be.  It could still be a bit more stiff in the low speed compression, but its, so, so ,so much better than stock.  My situation is a little different though, as I'm really trying to match the stock TTR shock to the '03 YZ front end.  Since the YZ is a lighter bike, I used 7W oil in the front forks.  Honestly they may be too stiff.  Time will tell.  I can always go back down to 5W if need be.  I barely have the adjusters clicked in at all of the front end, and it's firm already.

 

Stock Shim Stack 2005 TTR-250 New Stack
Rebound   Rebound 
ODThick  ODThick
170.45  170.45
270.20  200.30
270.20  270.20
330.20  270.20
330.15  330.20
330.25  330.20
290.20  330.20
330.20  230.25
    330.20
    330.15
    330.15
      
    New Stack
Stock Shim Stack 2005 TTR-250
 
Compression
Compression  ODThick
ODThick  380.15
380.15  380.15
380.15  380.15
380.15  380.15
380.15  380.15
380.15  380.15
380.15  380.15
230.25  380.15
380.20  380.20
360.25  230.25
320.25  380.12
270.25  380.15
250.25  380.15
230.25  380.20
200.30  360.25
170.45  360.25
    320.25
    270.25
    250.30
    200.30
    170.45



-- Edited by suzbandit987 on Monday 3rd of December 2012 02:18:15 AM



-- Edited by suzbandit987 on Monday 3rd of December 2012 02:19:45 AM

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I've spent about 400 USD dollars for every bit, nut, bolt, oil, shims, etc for this full suspension upgrade on my TTR.  I can say without any doubt this is money well spent.  The suspension is leaps and bounds above where it was.  It's not even the same bike.  Before I felt like I was going to get bounced off of the trail (and off the cliff) at any moment and now that the bike has dampening it stays under control.  You'll be very very happy if you upgrade your TTR suspension.



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suzbandit987 wrote:

I've spent about 400 USD dollars for every bit, nut, bolt, oil, shims, etc for this full suspension upgrade on my TTR.  I can say without any doubt this is money well spent.  The suspension is leaps and bounds above where it was.  It's not even the same bike.  Before I felt like I was going to get bounced off of the trail (and off the cliff) at any moment and now that the bike has dampening it stays under control.  You'll be very very happy if you upgrade your TTR suspension.


 

Thanks for the information.

I have been researching the fork swap for a few evenings now, lots to take in.

I also appreciate the post of the shock shim stacks. This is all new to me as I've done nearly all my wrenching on 4-wheeled rigs but I'm slowly getting it. Where did you source out your parts? (I am also state-side)

We are also around the same weight, so I am reading all of this with great interest.



-- Edited by TDVT on Monday 3rd of December 2012 10:41:00 PM

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I bought the YZ front end off thumpertalk.com.  I got some other odds and ends from ebay.  I had two rear shocks and that is where all of my shims came from.  I combined two sets of stock shims.  There is some place where you can buy whatever shims you need (I have their web-address at home.)  Their shims were ~2 dollars a piece in low qty's.



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Would someone help me out?  I need someone to take four measurments on their STOCK TTR-250  (With the bike off of the kick-stand and straight up.)

I would like the following (if someone would be so kind):

the distance between the ground and the drain plug

the distance between the ground and the top side of the lower trip clamp.

the distance between the ground and the top side of the upper trip clamp.

the distance between the ground and the bottom of the fork tube.

 

I understand the measurements can be different based off of someone's preload settings, etc, etc.  I don't need a lesson on all that.  I know already.  I just need to make sure my front and rear suspension, modified TTR is sitting close to the stock geometry.  Thank you for your time and help.



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31cm - the distance between the ground and the drain plug

92.5cm - the distance between the ground and the top side of the lower trip clamp. corrected!

112cm - the distance between the ground and the top side of the upper trip clamp. corrected!

23cm - the distance between the ground and the bottom of the fork tube.

The measurements are a bit approx. as I was in danger of the TTR falling on me whilst trying to balance it and use the tape measure at the same time disbelief



-- Edited by TTRfan on Thursday 20th of December 2012 08:39:14 AM

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Rear Shock Absorber - Q&A megathread
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Ok, here is where I am at with the rev-valved rear shock and the YZ front end:

 

30.5cm - the distance between the ground and the drain plug

88.9cm - the distance between the ground and the top side of the lower trip clamp.

110.5cm - the distance between the ground and the top side of the upper trip clamp.

29.2cm - the distance between the ground and the bottom of the fork tube.

 

The first 3 measurements are meaningful, the last one is just for curiosity.  I wanted the front end of my bike to sit lower and I was able to achieve that by raising the forks within the clamps.  It looks like I could set the stock geometry if I wanted.  Good to know.  I have room to play.  I could even lower the front end more if I wanted to.  We'll see, once I get some more seat time.

 



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I am sure you realise that with spacers under the handlebar clamps and bar risers you will be able to drop the front forks through even more smile

A mate reversed his bar clamps which move the bars back a tad and this allowed the bars to clear the forks so he could drop his through a lot without doing anything else.

Brian



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TTRfan wrote:

I am sure you realise that with spacers under the handlebar clamps and bar risers you will be able to drop the front forks through even more smile

A mate reversed his bar clamps which move the bars back a tad and this allowed the bars to clear the forks so he could drop his through a lot without doing anything else.

Brian


 

This is exactly what I did.  I went to work and machined myself some 1.125" tall spacers.  I'm just happy I'm able to get back to stock geometry with the new front end.  I didn't want to be raked out like a chopper guy, on this "offroad" bike.



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Upgrade shock?
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Has anyone fitted an aftermarket shock to their bike? I see that Wilbers make one. Not sure about anyone else, though.



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Have you seen these on ebay    They come in black too (as far as i know)



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barra8, I did see them, but thanks for the idea.

I'm mystified here. No-one knows everything, least of all me, but I've been around bike for a while and still can't see how a spring by itself can transform a shock's action, assuming the stock spring is ballpark, which, for me, the TTR one is.

Can someone enlighten me? All info gratefully received!

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If you fit the progressive spring & gold valve it will be the best it can be.

The standard spring is just very tall & requires a different style of riding. More balancing when going slow. I like the extra travel though.

For info on the gold valve see here Never fitted a gold valve kit yet so can't tell you how much difference it makes.

...........................

Jarrah.



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66T, I can offer some thoughts about springs..

I have to say first off that if someone makes a change, and it works for them, improving the ride for their taste and their riding conditions, then good for them (so different springs will work for some people).

But to go into history, once upon a time progressive springs were much more common, and I believe that this was because shock absorbers were then much, much more primitive.

Nowadays, the spring is merely a source of rebound energy to "power" the shock absorber system, which is far more complex than it used to be. Designing a shock absorber these days requires massive computing power, and precise engineering, as well as teams of test riders, and the result is that progressive resistance is delivered mainly by the shock, rather than the spring.

In fact the shock designers would consider the spring as almost an impediment - they just hope that owners set the sag so the ride height will be at the point they assumed in their shock design. There is not much to spring design to choose from but a straight wound spring might retain its spring coefficient better when hot.

Another relevant point is that even a straight (non progressive) spring actually is NOT linear but IS progressive from the point of view of the shock. This is because of the linkage system - the leverage ratio actually varies with travel, due to the complex linkage geometry. As the leverage ratio varies, the spring behaves like a stiffer or softer spring at that point in the travel. This is one reason why there have been so many linkage designs in the past - engineering evolution. 

Throwing a non standard progressive spring into the mix would upset the leverage curve in a hard to predict way not anticipated by the shock designers - so for optimum handling after changing to a progressive spring you would want to spend a lot of (expensive) effort on the shim stack. Too hard for me.

To go on a slight tangent now (considering the front forks), some forum readers might be surprised that, as recently as 3 years ago, a highly regarded multiple ISDE gold medal winner, parts supplier, and race team owner actually changed from USD forks to modified TTR forks because he thought they were better in certain enduro conditions.

In this light, the following link may be of interest:

http://www.dirtbikeworld.net/forum/archive/index.php/t-68384.html



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The rear progressive rear spring i have never heard a bad report on & apparently tranforms an unstable bike that can let go easy to a totally different feel. The obvious thing with travel is that if the spring reaches the bottom of it's travel the shocky will bottom out. That said....If your spring is wound different ie. harder it would make a difference as to where it bottoms out & also road holding ability.Also the height of the spring plays a big part in balance as the heigher it is the more you will have to balance-obviously.

I have heard different reports of the standard front forks being USELESS for offroad. I do not believe this though. The TTR forks are soft standard yes but if you put over the usual requirement of oil they become much harder. This is the same with Upside down forks. Anyone that tells you different is lying to themself as this has been confirmed on my mates YZ450F & my TT-R. Also an xt225 serrow & a few others ie. my old DR600 (now sold) & my XL185s (still have).My DR600 was too stiff/hard with 10W so i used 5W in those though. Also using 10W oil instead of the usual 5W helps heaps. I used 150ml of oil for each one of mine compared to the usual 120-130ml (from memory).

I'm not sure if fitting progresive springs would help but i have heard more bad then good with fitting these so i have'nt tried.  Aparrently it makes it too stiff & not good action in TT-R forks but as i said i have never tried this for this reason.

Of course it would depend on how you ride as to how these are set up but i found that all my bikes needed the extra oil so they did'nt bottom out easy.

I ride rough terrain & also like to do jumps so this is what works best for me.

......................

Jarrah.





-- Edited by barra8 on Sunday 27th of January 2013 07:53:06 AM

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66T wrote:

barra8, I did see them, but thanks for the idea.

I'm mystified here. No-one knows everything, least of all me, but I've been around bike for a while and still can't see how a spring by itself can transform a shock's action, assuming the stock spring is ballpark, which, for me, the TTR one is.

Can someone enlighten me? All info gratefully received!


I have wondered about the shock myself, Racetech also has a valve kit for the back, I believe.

On a general note, there are little snippets of info like this throughout the forum. It would be great to index them somehow.

 



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66T


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RE: Upgrade shock?
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Thank you all for your info, and interesting reading..

I get it about rising rate likages etc; I was just curious as to how an aftermarket shock spring on its own of equal specs can improve the shock action, like the Hyperpro seems to suggest.



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66T wrote:

Thank you all for your info, and interesting reading..

I get it about rising rate likages etc; I was just curious as to how an aftermarket shock spring on its own of equal specs can improve the shock action, like the Hyperpro seems to suggest.


 I was about to describe the progressive spring better but my internet dropped out because of the floods nono

Okay i'll try to keep it simple....The reason that the progressive spring is better....

The progressive spring is wound differently than the standard spring. Instead of being practically the same wind right through it is progressive....meaning that at the top of the spring it is soft-this helps to keep the wheel firmly planted for handling.

It then gets harder & harder as the spring goes down more- So you don't bottom out (as much)

The travel will become less because this spring will be harder at the bottom therefore stopping the travel.

It should sit down a bit more for you (squat) giving better handling.

..................................................................................................................................................

That's the theory anyway,take from it what you will.

................................

Jarrah.



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66T


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Thanks barra8. I see what you're saying.

But if the progressive spring is softer initially, won't the static sag and rider ride height be wrong? And if the shock sits further into the stroke, will it be stting into the rising rate area of the linkage and thus be harsh? What am I missing?ashamed



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66T wrote:

Thanks barra8. I see what you're saying.

But if the progressive spring is softer initially, won't the static sag and rider ride height be wrong? And if the shock sits further into the stroke, will it be stting into the rising rate area of the linkage and thus be harsh? What am I missing?ashamed


 The ride height i have already mentioned....It should sit down a bit more for you (squat) giving better handling.

It will be sitting further down the stroke as you say but SHOULD not be harsh as the spring should counteract this,but i do see what your saying.

..............................

Jarrah.



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is rear shock absorber tube include air or nitrogene
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Hello,

i from türkiye. I have got 1997 model TTR250 oe. I have bought soon. Is rear shock absorber tube include air or nitrogene? And how much fill  air or nitrogen (psi) in rear suspnsion tube? Thanks..



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Welcome to the TTR forum,Sinasi

A TTR rear shock is not normally owner serviced and is best left to specialists who have the necessary tools, experience and equipment to service.

It's a rather involved and tricky sevicing operation c for the amateur owner/rider and is best left to the specialist.

I certainly wouldn't try and service mine.
If no specialist was available I would consider another used shocker rather than attacking it myself. w

Martyn

 



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I know that Greywolf has a step-by-step repair guide here  but I agree with Martyn that any repairs or servicing are best left to the specialist with the right gear - and knowledge.

To the best of my knowledge the TTR's shock uses nitrogen. I use Justin Gibb to service and repair my shocks and this is what it says on his website:

Shock Service

Completely strip, clean and inspect shock for any wear or damaged parts. Replace the main seal, dust seals and bushes if required. Re-build on purpose built vacuum pump and re-gas with nitrogen 



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