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Post Info TOPIC: Linkage bearing replacement - fitting an All Balls linkage bearing kit


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Linkage bearing replacement - fitting an All Balls linkage bearing kit
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This is an extract from my project bike thread so it may read a little odd in places. I thought it might be useful to start a new thread for this job as the original post will get lost in time.

The first bolt attaching the drop arm to the frame is usually well stuck in. The removal technique I have found works is to undo the bolt about quarter of an inch and then start to beat the main bolt through with a wide punch on the bolt head. Keep spraying any exposed parts of the bolt with WD40 to help things along. That usually gets it moving after which you can use a decent wide round bar to drift out the bolt. I used an old link bolt which, of course, fitted perfectly. Make sure you clean it up well and lube it so you don't get it stuck as well smile

UPDATE: To prevent damaging the threads in the bolt, I bought a length of 12mm threaded bar from Toolstation and recut the end threads to fit those on the bolt. A much better tool for driving out the bolt. See pics farther down this thread.


Linkage arm refurb 006.jpg

Linkage arm refurb 008.jpg

The linkage certainly looked ripe for repair! The nut was very difficult to get off no
Linkage arm refurb 009.jpg

Lever out the old seals to get access to press out the bearings. These were definitely past their best.
Linkage arm refurb 010.jpg

I use two sockets in the vice to press out the old bearings. Use a bit of heat if they are really corroded in. 
Linkage arm refurb 011.jpg

The bearings on the link arm are a bit different as there are two with a space in between - similar to the swing arm bearings. I use a sharp edged s/s drift to drive these out.
Linkage arm refurb 012.jpg

I alway struggle to get out the rusty wire circlips on the shock bearing. I use a centre punch to bend or break the circlip.
Linkage arm refurb 016.jpg

and then prize the broken bits out with a small "glasses" screwdriver

Linkage arm refurb 017.jpg

The shock bush was well stuck so I had to use the blow torch to get it moving.

Linkage arm refurb 014.jpg 

I then gave the linkage a good scrape and wire brush. A mate gave me a stainless steel wire brush and it's brilliant!

These are the only parts you need to keep if you are using an AllBalls linkage kit as all the other parts, including the shock bearing, are in the package.

Linkage arm refurb 019.jpg

The linkage arm parts were left soaking in TFR overnight and I cleaned and dried them before starting assembly. 

The AllBalls linkage kit is very comprehensive and includes the lower shock bearing:linkage refurb1.jpg

Today was a reverse of last time and I used the vice and sockets to press in the new bearings.
linkage refurb2.jpg

It's a lot quicker to put it all back together than to strip the linkage down. It was soon all done with new bearings and seals installed along with lots of grease:

linkage refurb4.jpg


It was easier to turn the frame upside down to install the refurbed linkage and torque up the nuts and bolts.

linkage refurb5.jpg



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RE: Fitting an AllBalls linkage bearing kit
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When I put my swingarm back on I wondered whether there should have been something stopping the linkage sliding along the rod that is the lowest pivot in your last picture

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Pete Brown

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'94 Yamaha TTR 250 Raid (with Open Enduro headlight, grrr...)

'54 plate Suzuki GSF 650S (Bandit)

Previously Yamaha YBR125, Yamaha TY125, Yamaha TY250



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pedrosan wrote:

When I put my swingarm back on I wondered whether there should have been something stopping the linkage sliding along the rod that is the lowest pivot in your last picture


Nope - it is meant to have some sideways movement. I guess this is to allow for flexing of the shock and swing arm.

Brian 



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Phew! Cheers

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Pete Brown

Keighley, West Yorkshire

'94 Yamaha TTR 250 Raid (with Open Enduro headlight, grrr...)

'54 plate Suzuki GSF 650S (Bandit)

Previously Yamaha YBR125, Yamaha TY125, Yamaha TY250



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How much end-play is acceptable on the swingarm before the bearings ought to be replaced?

My swingarm's got about 2-3mm of vertical play at the dropouts, just a little donk-donk when you waggle it up and down. I think it's the bearings that support either end of the link-arm that are slightly suspect, but it's certainly not that bad and I can't be entirely sure exactly which one(s) are to blame without taking it all off, which will probably be my next job just to take the opportunity to grease everything up. Worth worrying about at the moment, or should I get a bearing kit and replace them all?

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Super Guru

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Padowan wrote:

How much end-play is acceptable on the swingarm before the bearings ought to be replaced?

My swingarm's got about 2-3mm of vertical play at the dropouts, just a little donk-donk when you waggle it up and down. I think it's the bearings that support either end of the link-arm that are slightly suspect, but it's certainly not that bad and I can't be entirely sure exactly which one(s) are to blame without taking it all off, which will probably be my next job just to take the opportunity to grease everything up. Worth worrying about at the moment, or should I get a bearing kit and replace them all?


 

Some bearing manufacturers will have different internal clearance specifications. For example- one company has tested their bearings & found that C3 clearances lasts the longest with their tests & their bearings. Another company will find after testing that a C4 clearance is best for that bearing the way they built & tested it. In the end it may have more or less play then another brand, but the bearings will be made with the clearances specified for that particular type & brand of bearing so this isn't a problem.

Also for example- one company will have 38 µm minumum clearance & 61 µm maximum clearance for a C4 bearing that is 50mm. Whereas the other company will have 36 minimum clearance & 63 maximum for a C4 bearing that is 50mm. This will in turn add to the play but will still be in spec with that particular brand of bearing.

Standard clearance/acceptable play is 1mm with standard bearing. However, if you're not using Genuine bearings I think that 1-1.5 mm play should be acceptable, given how many different bearings are required for the job, maybe even 2mm play for some brands of bearings. 3mm would be too much, no matter what brand.


Radial clearance is the play between the ball and raceway perpendicular to the bearing axis. Axial clearance is the play parallel to the bearing axis and is typically at least 10 times greater than the radial clearance. Generally, internal radial clearance will be reduced 80% of the interference fit amount. That said, you have to take into account the side play in bearings aswell as up & down. Especially with interference fits.

Also the ball type bearing adds to the end result of play-part N36.  HERE This swivel bush will have alot more clearance than the roller needle bearings as it has to take the load.

All this said, it would pay to use the collar from the bearing company that supplied you the bearings as they will NOT be right for other brands of bearings unless all specs are the same as each other.

Oh & if your not using the Genuine ones with the inserts (it holds the bearing together so all those annoying needle roller bearings don't drop out) you will have a little more play than usual.

Hope that helps?

Jarrah



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Super Guru

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The first rear suspension joint to wear is the lower shock bearing. It is the usual suspect!

It is very very difficult to tell what's going on down there and after replacing the "wrong" joint a few times I new usually replace the whole lot if there is enough play to worry the MOT man.

Brian

 



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TTRfan wrote:

The first rear suspension joint to wear is the lower shock bearing. It is the usual suspect!

Brian

 


 +1

Yep, part N36.  HERE

Jarrah



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RE: Linkage bearing replacement - fitting an All Balls linkage bearing kit
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Update. Since first publishing this thread, I have found some upper link arm bolts very hard to shift.

To prevent damaging the threads in the bolt, I bought a length of 12mm threaded bar from Toolstation and recut the end threads to fit those on the bolt. Not a tidy job as you will see in the following pics but it does the job beautifully wink

Upper link arm removal 1.jpg

 

Just wind the threaded bar into the recalcitrant bolt and knock it through.

Upper link arm removal 2.jpg

 

And out it comes!

Upper link arm removal 3.jpg

Job done!

Brian



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Hi Brian,

I'm doing my linkage bearings now. Like a div, I used a long punch to get the link bolt out. I now have the punch stuck inside the link bolt. How can I get it out? Or am I in need of a new link bolt?

About to try heating the link bolt over the hob, no gas in the blowtorch.

EDIT: It didn't work.

EDIT 2: Brian, I'm even more of a div. THERE'S A NEW ONE IN THE KIT!  disbelief

-- Edited by Fladdem on Saturday 19th of April 2014 01:47:23 PM



-- Edited by Fladdem on Saturday 19th of April 2014 01:51:45 PM

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v8r


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Thread dig, any tips for removing the bolt that holds the link into the frame? Investigating frozen suspension on my sons bike and seized link bearings are the culprit, specifically this end of the link.. a bigger hammer and rattle gun haven't worked yet, its the chainside one I cant get to free up, the other undone fine...

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The LH nut is captive and locks into a tab on the frame. You need to undo it from the RH side wink



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v8r


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So, similar setup to the one in the swing arm then? Needs drifting out from rhs to lhs?

PS: that tab may or may not exist anymore ;)

 

looking up from under the bike..

20140830_173333.jpg



-- Edited by v8r on Saturday 30th of August 2014 10:02:41 AM

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v8r wrote:

Needs drifting out from rhs to lhs?


Yep - loosen the bolt on the RHS a bit and then put a drift on the head of it to start driving the main bolt through. Undo the bolt a bit more and repeat, etc. 

The bolt you are trying to remove is the one on the far left of the pic below:

Linkage arm refurb 019.jpg



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v8r


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Yep, I thought as much, thats what ive been doing. Seems a pretty solid belt from a 3lb hammer isnt enough. She must be well rusted together, no wonder the suspension was stiff!

 

EDIT: 24hrs soaking in a liberal dose of wd40 and penetrene plus multiple applications of an unreasonable amount of force and its out.. ugly, but out :)



-- Edited by v8r on Monday 1st of September 2014 10:49:58 PM

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A "thumbs up" for the kit and advice.
A "squeak" was developing in the rear suspension which turned out being one totally knackered needle roller bearing in the relay lever and the other on the way out. Easily repaired with the manual and the photos above. Thanks to Brian for the advice and quickly getting to goods in the post.

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TTRfan wrote:
v8r wrote:

Needs drifting out from rhs to lhs?


Yep - loosen the bolt on the RHS a bit and then put a drift on the head of it to start driving the main bolt through. Undo the bolt a bit more and repeat, etc. 

The bolt you are trying to remove is the one on the far left of the pic below:

Linkage arm refurb 019.jpg


 Hmmm, interesting one Brian. Fitted my linkage kit today, and it's great. Strange though, all of my main bolts, the two in your picture and the main one which connects the link to the swing arm, have grease nipples in, but like your two, the new main one doesn't.......

Is that a model difference? seems like a backward step. Used the new one though as the old one was fairly badly worn.

also fitted my fleabay shocker, which appears to be fine without refurbing. Just waiting for the top shock bearing to arrive before I finally re-assemble it properly.



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Yep - the older TTRs had grease nipples on all the bolts plus on the swing arm. Later TTRs lost them. Progress eh? no

But, to be honest, if the seals are working well you aren't going to get much grease in any of the bearings after fitting Also, over greasing the swing arm can push the seals out from under the end caps.



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v8r


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yep, something i noticed on my 94 vs my two post 2000 models.. as a side note, my pro-x brand linkage kit came with shafts and collars suitable for greasing, not sure about the AB kit. got the new bits fitted today, just got to check the clutch basket (i reckon its notched, really jerky unpredictable clutch release), then button up this bike, its my sons one :)

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Just fiited new bearing etc and all gone well apart from i still have a slight amount of play which seems to stem from the bolt in the drop link ( the lower eyes of the 'u' link) which is not bushed/bearing equiped - bolt is not in particularly poor condition but you can feel a little play when dissassembled.

anyone else found this?

Andy



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andyh wrote:

Just fitted new bearing etc and all gone well apart from i still have a slight amount of play which seems to stem from the bolt in the drop link ( the lower eyes of the 'u' link) which is not bushed/bearing equipped - bolt is not in particularly poor condition but you can feel a little play when disassembled.

anyone else found this?

Andy


Hi Andy

It doesn't matter if there is some play off the bike. When the bolt is in place and properly torqued up, the lower eyes of the link arm will clamp against the bearing collars and the bolt won't be able to move. The only movement will be betwixt the collars and bearing.

Brian



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Spot on Brian - all done up nicely

cheers



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Hello, I'm doing just this job on mine but could not get the nut and bolt on the far left in the picture out and had to cut the nut, new ones are coming in at £50, does any one have any thrifty ideas? cheers

 



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Hi Lee

Yamaha swing arm bearings diagram.jpg

So you are needing parts 43 and 44 on the pic above?

If so, the AllBalls kit includes the bolt and I can sort you out with a nut.

That must have been quite a job cutting through the old bolt confuse

Brian



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lee


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thanks for the replies, no it's 31 and 29 in the diagram

 



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Ah - that one. Yes. it can be a pig to get out coz you can't really get a good hit on it no

See my email.

Brian



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Here is the technique I use to non-destructively remove those awful retaining clips. I think they are called "split rings" and I have to deal with them a lot with my R/C hobbies.

You need a small screwdriver. I use one that has a 1mm head. Then another larger screwdriver. Size not so important there. My larger one is 3 or 4mm.

First press the bearing as far as you can to one side. This will open up the area on the other side for the ring to come out.

Now insert the tiny screwdriver above the ring:

5Ahvv0y.jpg

Then pry the ring out enough to get the larger screwdriver in and lift:

FzASq92.jpg

Now if you find that you can't get the ring out at all with the tiny screwdriver (eg. rust) another method is to use a dental pick. One with a long sharp point. Push the pick sideways against one end of the ring then lightly tap it under the ring until it lifts enough to insert the tiny screwer, then proceed as normal. With this method you might have to try all 4 ends of all the rings to find one that the pick can get under.

When installing the new snap-rings I highly recommend filing all of the ends at an angle to make it easier to get them out in the future. File one edge to make it easy to insert the tiny screwdriver, and another at the end in case you have to use a pick:

eDHFRI9.jpg




Also, a piece of threaded bar stock, couple nuts, and some washers makes a much better press than a vise and really cheap:

fPSUvc3.jpg



-- Edited by Sprok on Monday 29th of February 2016 02:26:43 PM

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