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Post Info TOPIC: Basic tool kit & spares. What to carry on a ride?


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Basic tool kit & spares. What to carry on a ride?
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Years ago when I last went riding I used to fill up my backpack with all types of useless crap that was heavy and probably only usefull on everyone elses bikes.

What basic tools and spares specifically suited to a TTR should I carry as a minimum?  Generally we wouldn't venture anymore than about 100km's from the car/campsite.

 



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Clip a spare split link onto your front brake hose, a couple of tyre levers and a front tube (if you're not happy riding it back flat), one of the handy double ended spanners from TotallyTTRs, phillips head screwdriver (opening airbox and draining float bowl when you get it under water!), 10mm spanner to take seat off, spare spark plug and spark plug spanner.



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Our TTR Guru, Brian, penned a wonderful post on another web site on this very topic - and more.

I have taken a copy and now show it here:-

 

Some Ideas on Preparing Your Bike for Trail Riding

One of the best ways to ensure you enjoy your trail riding is to make sure your bike is reliable when faced with the harsh environment which trail riding sometimes puts it through. Riding alone is not recommended, as this could endanger yourself if there was an accident on your ride.

Firstly members of the TRF must ride legal motorcycles on legal carriageways; this means your bike needs to be street legal. It has to have lights that work as well as brake lights, horn, legal number plate, legal exhaust, and a rear reflector and road legal tyres. (Note that a daytime MOT certificate will have different requirements).After the legalities have been attended to, check over the following:

Levers
Don't have them too tight on the handlebars they will snap off if you fall off. A good quality brush guard usually helps protect them in a fall. Carry spare levers. Cables Dirt and water gets into the clutch and throttle cables making them notchy and stiff. Work them whilst squirting in an appropriate cable lubricant. Light controls reduce fatigue.


Waterproof the sparkplug
If you don't know when it was last changed, fit a high quality new one. Fit a new waterproof sparkplug cap and seal all sparkplug lead joints with silicone sealant, i.e. the stuff that seals round the edge of your bath.

Wheel Bearings
Jack the wheels off the ground, grasp the wheel at the top and bottom and push and pull. If there is any free play replace the bearings and the seals. Bearings are only about £5 each, as are the seals.

Brake pads
Mud and water equals grinding paste, which wears out pads and discs quickly. Road pads are useless, fit sintered ones instead. Clean the brakes after every ride to prevent them from seizing.

Chain and Sprockets
Always keep them in good condition. A hooked sprocket will wear a chain very quickly.Apply oil to the chain after cleaning to prevent corrosion and to help preserve the o-rings.

Engine Oil
Change it as described in your bike manual or ask for advice on the forum.

Air Filter
Clean or renew regularly, you will be amazed at what finds its way into the air box.  Check and oil with the correct sticky filter oil.

Toolkit 
Include spanners to remove wheels and adjust chain etc, pliers and screwdrivers. Also carry tyre levers, valve key, puncture outfit or spare tubes and a bicycle pump. You could also carry items like spare chain joining links, plastic zip ties and a role of insulation tape. Always carry a spare spark plug for your bike and also the right spanner to fit it.

Protection
You must wear an approved crash helmet when riding. Suitable gloves, eye protection (goggles or visor), knee and elbow pads, and a good pair of MX-style riding boots are recommended.  Either wear clothing with built-in protection, or use a body armour undersuit.


This will all seem like common sense to most but it might give a few ideas to the novice trail rider.

Some more tips - preparing your bike properly has many benefits:

  • Improved life of your pride and joy
  • Better handling
  • Enhanced reliability
  • Also washing your bike after the ride has benefits, checking the machine is in good working order i.e.: no bolts undone, wear and tear of chain and also lubricating a clean one is better.  Remember that it is an offence to ride with a dirty number plate.

Punctures can be a problem but with the right preparation the risk of a puncture can be reduced. Doing the following will help:

Use heavy duty inner tubes
These will help to prevent punctures from hard impacts where the tube is pinched onto the rim or heads of spoke nipples. Using duct tape around the rim to cover the spoke nipples will also help. Don't run HD inner tubes at very low pressures as they will move within the tyre and rip out the valve stem. This is quite a common occurrence!

Enlarge valve hole
This will allow the valve to move giving some warning that the tyre is starting to rotate dragging the tube around with it. The inner tube can be realigned by letting the tyre down and rotating the wheel backwards until the valve is straight.

Good tyre security bolt
Vital for holding the tyre in position on the rim especially when running with low tyre pressure, without it the valve is likely to be ripped out of the tube if the tyre slips on the rim. 

Tyre pressure
Running the tyres with reduced pressure will improve the grip, but let the pressure go to low and you risk a compression puncture. Don't refit the retaining nut/ring on the rim of the wheel after changing tubes or keep it wound right up to the dust cap.

Chain and sprockets
Upping the size of both chain sprockets will help to reduce wear also make sure the closed end of the chain link clip is facing towards the direction of rotation.

Exhaust make as quiet as possible (road legal!) - repack if necessary.

Suspension
Lower ride height if need be and soften so that full travel is used.


Spares to Carry
Tube - 21" front if you can only carry one as this will do for the rear. 
Chain - short piece 2 to 3 links + joining link plus chain splitter.
Spare levers for your bike - clutch/front brake.
Tyre levers two minimum, decent spoon type.
Tools spark plug spanner, pump or CO2 cylinders, pliers, screwdriver (Pozidrive & plain), spanners to remove both wheels, tow rope, cable ties, some spare nuts and bolts with washers, spare inner cable kit to fit throttle and clutch & elastic bands (cut from old inner tube).
Spare Bulbs if travelling at night. 
Small first aid kit
.
Recovery Service - If your a member of a recovery service, it'd be handy to take your membership card with you on the trail.
Chocolate bar.
Wallet or some money.
Can of tyre inflater.
Mobile phone
.


Washing the bike after a ride. If using a power washer keep the lance away from the wheel bearings, suspension bushes and chain. It really helps to have some Pro-Clean to spray on before that final rinse to move any stubborn stains! If you can, take it for a ride after to help dry off and warm the chain. Lube the chain so it's ready for your next ride and won't go rusty. Spray the bike with Pro-Care, Duck Oil or WD40 to dispel any remaining water.  

 



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Budleigh Salterton. Devon



Guru

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Tools to carry.
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My TTR didn't come with the original toolkit so i'm unsure as to what tools came with the TTR . I'm guessing it would be quite a basic selection like with most bikes. I plan to use a tool bag on the rear mudguard to carry the tools i'd need . Mainly it will be the tools to remove the wheels and tyres to repair a puncture.

What tools do you all carry ?

 



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Super Guru

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Hi Andy

This is what a complete TTR toolkit looks like including retaining rubber strap.

It's surprisingly useful except the wheel spanner is the wrong size. It is 24/22 and should be 24/17. I found this out a long time ago when I had a front wheel puncture and no way to undo the front axle no

Hence I got these made up wink

Brian

New toolkit.JPG



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Do you have any of those toolboxes for sale Brian?

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Mine is missing the plug key which is a pain, it's smaller than the Tuono plugs

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locky wrote:

Do you have any of those toolboxes for sale Brian?


They are pretty rare as they have been missing from almost all the TTRs I have broken for spares.

I did manage to make up a kit once from a local bike breaker. He had put all the tools and tool boxes in a crate and it was a case of going through and picking out the ones for the TTR toolbox. A lot of Yamahas use the same tools. If you try that then it's best to take along a spark plug to check you get the right spark plug spanner though!

The key parts are the box and strap! It's possible to obtain the tools relatively easily.

I will have a look in my spares box just in case and get back to you Locky.

Brian



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Thanks Brian, i do have a spare Yamaha spark plug tool and could easily make the rest up. I'll just keep a eye out for a toolbox. I do plan on fitting some sort of tool bag to the rear fender for puncture tools.

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2004 TTR250. White Brothers E series exhaust, modded airbox, rejetted, 13/48 c&s & many more mods..



Super Guru

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locky wrote:

Thanks Brian, i do have a spare Yamaha spark plug tool and could easily make the rest up. I'll just keep a eye out for a toolbox. I do plan on fitting some sort of tool bag to the rear fender for puncture tools.


In the early days I used to use a rear fender bag but as the joints and muscles got less flexible I found myself catching my boot on it getting on and off and quite often ended up sprawling in the mud disbelief



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Yes age does make the hobby a bit harder and i'm not as flexible as i was 10 years ago plus i have a back problem. But a bloke that rides with us on the odd occasion is 70, he's struggling but can still ride well, i hope i'm like him when i get to that age. Never to old :)

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2004 TTR250. White Brothers E series exhaust, modded airbox, rejetted, 13/48 c&s & many more mods..

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