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Post Info TOPIC: "Modernising" a 1993 Yamaha TTR250 Open Enduro


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Made a little bit more progress on the front brake. Whilst waiting to sort out the brake line, I checked out the caliper. One of the pins had seized in and it took quite a while to free it off. All cleaned up now, greased and re-assembled. Sliding nicely now.

I dug out a pair of good brake pads from my parts box this morning and spent 5 minutes or so puzzling as to how to fit them. Bear in mind its still quite early in the morning and I am not up to full speed. I think you will see from the pic below why I couldn't work out how the black pad fitted. The copper coloured pad on the right is a correct fit wink

Brake pad wrong.jpg

I am not sure how the black pad got into my parts box and what bike it might fit confuse

Just need to put a spot of grease on the pins now and fit the correct pads. The caliper can then go on the TTR and its another part out of the way wink

Got an appointment with an "asthma nurse" this morning to try and identify the cause of a constant irritating cough that won't go away but, hopefully, that won't take long and I can start to refurbish the brake reservoir later on.

Brian



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As I was going through my brake pads, I came across a couple of the stainless steel "backing" pads that fit to one of the rear brake pads and realise that I left it out of my refurb. Can't remember which pad they fit (I think it's the one against the piston?) but does anyone know what they do and how essential are they please?


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I am guilty of the same omission on my brakes, Brian.

They should be fitted to the piston pad as you presumed.

I have found NO difference in use of the brake. I believe they are fitted to "reduce" possible brake squeal, but since mine have never squealed I can't vouch for their efficacy! wink

Martyn



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Thanks for the support and encouragement guys - you have spurred me on.

OK - so today was all about "handlebar stuff".

I have temporarily shelved my mission to find a cheap repair method for the standard TTR front brake line as my saviour Cubber appeared this afternoon with a nice new blue Hel brakeline. So the brake caliper was soon fitted along with the new brakeline.

Handlebar stuff 2.jpg

Next up was filling up the handlebars with switches and levers. Not a difficult job but very time consuming cleaning, testing and fitting the parts.

Handlebar stuff 1.jpg

I fitted the brake reservoir first. The original cross-headed bolts that hold the reservoir top on are very soft, corrode in and quite often have to be drilled out. I managed to source some good replacements made in stainless steel with Allen socket heads.

I shouldn't have any difficulty removing them in the future although, typing this, I realise that I am going to have to go back and give the threads a smear of copper grease as I understand that the stainless and ali combination can have its own problems otherwise.

I carry the levers in stock so fitted new ones. I was disappointed to find that the clutch lever is a bit floppy so will go back and pinch the perch up a tad in the vice.

The original lever pivot bolts are quite long as they went through the original white handguards to hold them in place. As a consequence they protrude from their perches. After a search through my "miscellaneous" box I found two perfect fitting bolts, one in chrome and the other plain. I like the chrome one so will get Googling to see if I can source a chrome one for the clutch side.

I stock the extra long throttle and clutch cables for the high and wide Dakar High Renthal bars so they were soon fitted.

I was hoping to fit a set of the open ended black grips but we are out of stock so I had better get an order in to our supplier tomorrow. The reason I am fitting these is that I am going to use Polisport wrap around hand guards and it saves having to modify a set of standard grips by sawing off the ends.

I think I have prevaricated long enough so tomorrow I will clear the bench, dust off the engine and gearbox and strip it down and refit the internals. The reason I stripped them out was that I had the whole engine soda blasted and I didn't want to risk damaging any parts. In retrospect this may have been unnecessary but at least it made the engine lighter when I was carrying it around.

The first major milestone for the project was getting a rolling chassis and the next will be getting the engine running - hopefully...

Hey ho - tomorrow is another day wink

Brian

 



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Thanks Matt. 

Today was "E" day so the workshop bench was cleared and the dust blown off the engine and here it is in all its resprayed glory!

Engine strip 001.jpg

First problem I noticed was that despite some masking tape stuffed into the oil sight glass recess, the glass has been well and truly painted over - not sure how to get around that without spoiling the glass cry

Engine strip 003.jpg

I cut around the joints of the cases etc as best I could with a sharp Stanley knife but the paint is very thick - an ali etch coat plus the two-pack colour coat(s). It took a while but eventually I got the engine back into its component parts:

Engine strip 004.jpg

Engine strip 005.jpg

There are quite a few chips in the paint where the cases came apart but what will count is what it all looks like when it's back in the bike!

A big disappointment was the barrel. I had it rebored and it had rusted quite badly and it may not just be surface rust. I suppose it didn't have a protective coating of oil and either some of the soda blasting material got inside or it was moisture. Not the end of the world but not ideal cry

Looking back, the soda blasting was done in June 2011 and, after mucho delay, I got the resprayed engine back in October 2011. I think I lost a bit of enthusiasm because of this delay hence not looking at the engine again until today disbelief

Engine strip 006.jpg

I cleaned up the edges of the cases with some wet and dry to try and stop the paint flaking and have given the cases, head and barrel a real good clean to make sure no extraneous material is lurking in their inner recesses. I used a neat TFR spray, power wash and flushed with hot water followed by a blow dry on the airline and a smothering of WD40 wink

Next up will be assembling the crank and gears so I expect to spend some time sorting out parts and checking them over before installation

The sun is out here in Devon and it looks like we are going to have a lovely afternoon biggrinbiggrinbiggrin

Brian



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I started the day with good intentions but got distracted no

I remembered to put the AllBalls main bearing kit in the freezer first thing - snuggled up alongside my pork faggots in Westcountry sauce, smoked mackerel fillets and steak smile

Engine build 001.jpg

I used a propane torch to warm the steel bearing housings and then dropped the ice-cold bearings in. Worked a treat as they tapped fully home quite easily. That was a lot easier than when I was building the 325 engine where I heated the cases in the oven. I got into trouble with Trish I recall as the oven and kitchen stank and our pizzas smelt and tasted oily disbelief

Engine build 002.jpg

I was pleased to find the box with the rebuilt crank in. When I took it out the box was still heavy and underneath the newspaper wrapping I found the old conrod, big end bearing, bush and thrust washers.

Engine build 003.jpg

I occasionally get asked for little end bearings so it is worth mentioning that, in common with other engines of the period, such as the Suzuki DR350, the TTR doesn't have a removable bearing.

The gudgeon pin runs directly in the conrod. For some reason I had it in my mind that the TTR conrod was ali but its not, its some sort of ferrous material but why it has a copper finish I don't know confuse

Looking at the old conrod, I must have had a brain storm rebuilding the crank because it looks perfectly usable with no damage disbelief

At that point the sun was shining and I couldn't resist downing tools and taking the 325 out to fill up with petrol ready for a possible trail ride tomorrow. When I got back I had an urgent call to go help someone move stuff with my trailer so that was it for the day although I did have a cursory look (unsuccessful) for the engine internals when I got back. I know they are there somewhere but how much will be usable I don't know as the engine had suffered some damage. cry

To be continued....................



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The weather forecast was for heavy rain showers this morning so, after an early morning call to Martyn and Bob to cancel the run, I had little alternative but to crack on with the engine rebuild eh Martyn? smile

Unlike my previous rebuild, I remembered to fit new gearchange shaft and transmission shaft oil seals this time.

Engine build 004.jpg

I found the box with the engine parts and washed them in neat TFR, rinsed and blow dried them and followed up with a good spray of WD40 to get rid of any residual moisture and protect the surfaces.

Following the detailed instructions in the workshop manual carefully the internals were refitted. The biggest problem I had was in getting the selector forks in - took me ages and a bit of ye olde English....

All bearings and bearing surfaces had a liberal coating of an engine oil/STP mix that I use on rebuilds.

Engine build 006.jpg

Next I spread gasket goo (Loctite 574 - flange sealant) over the crankcase mating surface and was pleased that the other case went on relatively easily with just a bit of jiggling to line all the shafts up in their respective holes and sockets. The bolts were then replaced and torqued up not forgetting to put the neutral light cable clamp on one and a copper washer on another - as per the manual.

Engine build 008.jpg

Sod's Law dictated that we didn't have a drop of rain this morning so we could have had a dry trail ride after all  no

Never mind - perhaps I will have it back together by June after all Pete wink

Brian



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Slow progress this afternoon. I was missing lots of small parts and it took a while to round everything up, clean and fit it.

The last thing I had to do before the clutch cover goes back on is to fit and adjust the clutch. The pic below shows my home-made clutch holder in use plus a very useful little gear locking device which is a tidy alternative to jamming the gears with cloth whilst torqueing up the clutch retaining nut.

Engine build 009.jpg

The following pic shows how the clutch holder is made up from a plain steel plate and a friction plate pop rivetted together. Simples wink

Engine build 010.jpg

I discovered a relatively easy way to bend up the tabs on locking washers which is very useful where you can't really get anything else in to do it.

Engine build 012.jpg

I carried on putting the clutch together but was a bit confused as to why the plates weren't being squeezed up when I tightened the clutch spring bolts. It took me a while to realise that I was using a 6-plate outer (from a metal-tanked TTR) and a 7-plate inner (from the later blue TTR) disbelief

I need to use a 6-plate unit as the 7-plate clutch doesn't fit behind the narrower clutch cover from the earlier TTRs. The 7-plate clutch needs a deeper case which explains why the blue models hold 1100cc of oil rather than 1000cc.

It was at that point that I decided it was time to pack up for the night!

Brian



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I stripped out the clutch and now have all the correct 6-plate clutch parts fitted. Although it seems the wrong way around, the 6-plate clutch has longer springs than the 7-plate one confuse

Having completed the build on the clutch side inc fitting the oil filter housing etc, I next installed the flywheel with a new sprag clutch.

Engine build 013.jpg

I fitted the stator to the generator cover and its all ready to fit with a new gasket.

Engine build 014.jpg

I have quite enjoyed the engine rebuild so far and have more fun ahead with a complete refurb of the cylinder head.

Off trail riding again tomorrow so no more progress until Monday!

Brian



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Hi Matt

The indicators fit to brackets that are held on by the top yoke clamp bolts. Can't find a very good pic - this is the best I have - sorry!

indicator mount.jpg



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Here, I've taken this  shot especially for Matt. wink

IMG_0649.JPG

Please excuse the red Devon mud stains. smile

Martyn



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After some gardening, DIY and family distractions I was able to get back to the engine rebuild.

The generator cover was fitted with a new gasket. The small idler gear was fine but the larger gear was chewed by a worn starter pinion so had to be replaced. This project is getting more expensive by the minute cry

The original bolts that hold the starter cover are not good, they soon round out and are a pig to remove. I have managed to source some nice stainless bolts with small (8mm as 10mm heads just looked wrong) heads and I hope not to have worry about getting them out in the future. Just remember to use some copper grease if using stainless bolts in aluminium.

Engine build 015.jpg

The rust on the rebore wasn't as bad as it looked and was easily cleaned up. Here are the head and barrel ready to go.

Engine build 016.jpg

If you have read the whole thread you will know that I have bored the barrel to the maximum oversize and am using a new Wossner piston which takes it out to 263cc and gives a little extra oomph by raising the compression ratio from 10.2:1 to 10.5:1.

I decided to use the "fit the piston in the barrel first" technique today but found it quite a fiddle so might go back to "fit the piston to the conrod and then fit the barrel" technique next time.

Engine build 017.jpg

Engine build 019.jpg

Next up for attention are the valves. The original engine was pretty knackered and the valves were well coked up showing that at one stage the bike had run hot and lean and then started burning a lot of oil.

A "before" shot of the valves.

Engine build 020.jpg

I expect any mechanic reading this will cringe at how I clean the valves but I haven't had a problem yet using this technique! I stick the valves in the electric drill and then get most of the coke off with a metal scraper blade and then follow up with 2 or 3 different grades of emery paper.

Engine build 021.jpg

Engine build 025.jpg

I was surprised at how thick the crud was on the exhaust valves so weighed them before and after. There was about 2 grammes difference after cleaning! The valves now look fine and are definitely re-usable. The seats will grind in nicely.

Engine build 023.jpg

The grinding in process takes a while so I stopped for a BLT and cuppa at this point biggrinbiggrinbiggrin

To be continued....

Brian



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Dead right Martyn - no gardening or other outside work possible whilst its "droughting" down with rain!

Just as well that I have a bit of spare time. The observant reader may have noticed from my pic that I have made a small error on assembling the bottom half of the engine. I need to strip off the clutch cover and fit the cam chain guide that got over looked.

Also, in my enthusiasm to get the barrel and piston fitted, I forgot to fit the O ring at the base of the barrel so the barrel need to come off again. Don't like this sort of thing as it increases the chances of damaging the new piston and piston rings. disbelief

I think I got over confident and stopped following the step-by-step assembly guide in the manual. cry

I think I am doing better with assembling the head and will double check I haven't forgotten anything!



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ps Brian, since people have been cleaning valves they have been sticking them in drill bits. When I worked in a motorcycle shop in London as a teenager, we did EVERY valve in a drill! the only time we didnt reuse valves was when the exhaust valve stem had been "burned" dark blue (tempered) where it joined the vavle head, then we threw them away - as without fail, any you didnt throw away but chose to reuse, the valve head came off usually at high RPM....... you know the rest of the story



-- Edited by matteo on Wednesday 9th of May 2012 05:49:38 PM

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Thanks for the reassurance Matt! And I thought I had discovered a clever technique wink 

Forgetting to install the cam chain guide was a bigger mistake than I anticipated. I had to strip out the clutch to fit it no

Anyways up, I took a deep breath and got on with doing it plus fitting the O ring to the base of the barrel. Set me back a bit though.

Back to the head. Several decades ago I bought a little device that goes in the end of an electric drill and oscillates the valve which makes grinding in the valves a relatively quick process.

Engine build 027.jpg

All valves ground in and I was ready to turn the head over to do the more difficult bits.

Engine build 028.jpg

Using a valve compressor is a bit cumbersome but I have strong thumbs and am able to compress the springs enough to fit the colletts which saves a lot of time.

Engine build 030.jpg

I made sure that I carefully followed the manual at all stages this afternoon and don't think I have forgotten anything else!

The head has been put on - not forgetting the collets - and torqued down. Valve clearances have been set and the timing chain adjuster fitted. To finish off I need to fit the cam cover, a starter motor and the oil feed pipe and I think the engine will be ready to fit into the frame.  Busy tomorrow Martyn???

Brian



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Here's something I have learned over the years. when I take something apart I usually take pics as I go, then if I time lapse(life gets in the way) I look at the pics in reverse order, before I assemble - why do I do this? Do you have any idea how tiresome it is when you have rebuilt a car engine, got it back in the car and are ready to turn the key and you think "oh F#$k thats what that little package is on the dash..." and had to pull it out again....
I hate when that happens!

PS your cylinder head looks fantastic!

Matt



-- Edited by matteo on Wednesday 9th of May 2012 09:58:30 PM

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Cubber wrote:

Funny you should ask, Brian.

I was wondering (as I read your write up) if you were contemplating self assembly. confuse

I would be privileged to assist your endeavors. What time? smile

Martyn


You are a star Martyn!

I have had a look at what still needs to be done before the engine goes back in and its not too bad:

  • fit starter motor - will need to be a new one as the original was toast and I never seem to get a good spare with the breakers
  • clean up and paint heads and nuts of engine bolts
  • clean, check and fit solenoid and associated wiring as it's easier to access without the engine in
  • clean and paint oil line and banjo bolt heads (I annealed the washers earlier)
  • work out how to protect the frame as the engine goes back in

I should be sorted for after lunch - about 2pmish?

Brian

PS to Pete - I daren't even think about how many hours I have spent on the motor but it is unusual to strip one down as far as I did. Apart from the fact it was necessary, I think it is good for me to have done just about every possible job on a TTR such that I can give other owners meaningful advice from my own personal experience wink

PS to Matt - good point well made smile



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A bit of fiddling about cleaning and spraying nuts and bolts, fitting the starter, new spark plug, oil feed pipe, new terminal in the stator connector block and a new magnetic sump plug and the engine was ready to fit biggrin

Engine build 031.jpg

Engine build 032.jpg

I remembered to wire the clutch actuating lever forward to stop it getting caught as the engine went in, protected the frame with some rags and was good to go. Martyn turned up as planned and, with his excellent help, the engine fell into place almost with no effort - thanks Martyn wink

The engine bolts are all in and tightened and I am a in a bit of a daze as this was such a big step forward with the project. So I have taken some pics of the engine in the frame and come indoors to update the blog and have a cuppa smile

Engine build 034.jpg

Engine build 035.jpg


Must remember to put some oil in the sump before starting it.....



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What better thing to do in a drought than help a friend? aww

My assistance wasn't really required - if Brian had whistled the engine would have jumped in itself. biggrin

This is the Get Ready position ....................

IMG_0654.JPG

 

This is the single handed installation position ...................

Img_0657.jpg

 

This is the Nearly Done position .......................

IMG_0662.JPG

 

The TTR is certainly looking good. It needs the fiddly bits to complete now. Don't forget to tighten the sump plug, Brian.

Martyn



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Got to admit that was the easiest engine install ever but it's always easier with two so thanks again Martyn wink

This update has no new pictures and is probably quite boring but I need to get it out of my system!

After sorting out some spares for customers, I cleaned up and sprayed the metal parts of the solenoid and installed it along with the battery earth wires, battery box and battery.

I remembered to tighten the sump plug (thanks for the reminder Martyn!) and filled the sump with oil. I took out the spark plug and the oil bleed bolt then tried unsuccessfully to turn the engine over to prime the oilways. 

What followed was a methodical but tedious check through the obvious causes.

In order to check the solenoid was working I disconnected its connector block and took power direct from a spare battery to it. This effectively shorts out the solenoid which worked fine as did the starter mechanism. I kept the engine turning until oil came out of the bleed hole and then replaced the bolt - at least the starter mechanism and oil pump were working!

I checked through the safety switches. The side stand connector was shorted out (using a connector block with a loop of wire joining the terminals) whilst I source a proper a switch so no problem there.

The clutch switch seemed to be causing a problem and, although the gearbox was in neutral, I found that the starter would only work if I pulled in the clutch. It occurred to me to install a speedo after which I could then see that the neutral light wasn't on.

Location of neutral switch:

neutral switch.jpg

I checked the connections on the neutral switch's lead and they seemed OK so I got a bit depressed as I assumed there was a problem with the neutral switch in the gearbox which would be a real pain.

I had a cup of tea (always makes me think better) and had the presence of mind to check the continuity of the earth wire with the mutimeter. Hey Presto! Nothing registered so there was an internal break in the wire.

I tested out the cure with a piece of wire straight from the neutral switch to the loom bullet connector and the neutral light came on and the starter worked without pulling in the clutch. Phew! biggrin

Packed it in for the night.

Tomorrow I will need to sort out a carburettor and install it along with the airbox, an exhaust and petrol tank. I think I could then try and fire it up. The pressures on then winkwink

Brian



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A few pics and a couple of videos this time smile

It took a while to refurb the carb as the steel parts were rusty so I stripped them off, cleaned them up and sprayed them silver.

I think a previous owner had run the TTR with no air filter as the slide looked like it had been shot with a twelve bore so needed swapping out.

carb and start 001.jpg

 

Although not looking brilliant, I promise you that the carb now looks 100% better!

carb and start 002.jpg

carb and start 003.jpg

carb and start 004.jpg

carb and start 005.jpg

I attached the breather pipes before installation and this made life a bit easier as they can be difficult to fit to the carb after the carb is on.

At this point I found I had fitted the inlet stub upside down - doh disbelief

Soon fixed that and the carb was installed and attached to the throttle cables.

I have a small collection of airboxes but most have been butchered in some way. With a bit of mixing and matching, I got a decent one together. A cleaned and oiled air filter went in and I started getting eager as I wasn't too far away from starting up.

At this point I just grabbed whatever exhaust header, exhaust and petrol tank I could find and put them on. It does mean having to go back over but I said I was eager!

The time came to press the button and, after a few false starts as the engine cleared the "rebuild" oil in the cylinder, the beast came to life and sounds sweet - phew biggrinbiggrinbiggrin

Petrol is leaking from somewhere so I switched off the tap and let the carb run dry. Need to sort that out - whatever it is.

Here are a couple of videos of the TTR running.

Very pleased.



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Very very chuffed but haven't checked for oil leaks yet....

The only smoke was as the oil in the combustion chamber cleared biggrinbiggrinbiggrin

A slight knock on start up but only for a fraction of a second until the oil got around. No vibes that I was aware of.

The finishing off always takes the time but maybe MOT it next week?

Brian



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The bike stand supporting the TTR is covered in paper so it was a simple job to drop the stand and check for tell-tale spots of oil. I am pleased to say there were none. 

I took off the dodgy tank and the exhaust system to gain access to the engine mounting plate bolts up by the rear shock. They are all fitted and torqued up now. I have to remember to replace a nut on the front head steady as the one previously used wasn't self locking.

Thinking ahead to what is needed for the MOT, I fitted the rear brake lever with a new pivot bolt and plenty of copper grease. I cleaned up and fitted a brake light switch and found the wire routing a bit fiddly and where having another TTR alongside to copy from was a life saver.

Brake lever and switch.jpg

After a bit of fiddling about, I jury rigged a rear light and was pleased that both the tail light and brake light switch are working. I think I have been lucky with the loom which, apart from the butchering of some connectors, seems to be good.

I was confused by a spare blue connector at the rear of the loom where the tail light connectors join until I remembered I need to fit a number plate light - which requires a number plate mount - and a number plate!

I decided at that stage to list all the little jobs remaining - and filled an A4 sheet no

A good point to pack up for the night.

New number plate now ordered from eBay and hope to get that by the middle of next week as, you never know, I might be needing it to ride the TTR to the MOT. I am assuming of course that the clutch and gearbox are OK which may be a big assumption!

Tomorrow is another day!

Brian



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The boss has been away for the weekend so I managed to spend most of the day in the workshop without feeling guilty!

I am slowly working through The List of jobs I wrote yesterday.

I started off with fitting the Talon 14 tooth front sprocket, Renthal R3 chain, lower chain guide (yep - I only just remembered to fit this before attaching the split link smile), and top chain guard. I am using a 14/44 gearing as this TTR is not going off road! My TTR needed 106 links for the adjusters to work properly. 

I want to use this TTR to test out digital speedo heads and senders before sending them out to customers so used the longer drive shaft to enable me to fit the magnet etc. I have left the cover off for now as I am debating whether to use the full cover or not. As it isn't going off road I don't have to worry about the chain clogging around the front sprocket with dirt and stones so I think I will use the full size original.

Pic of today's progress on the LHS of the bike. Ignore the rusty side stand - it's just temporary!

Side views 002.jpg

Moving over to the RHS, I fitted a shorty header pipe, cleaned and sprayed a heat guard and fitted it.

The glorious finishing touch is one of our trail-friendly stainless steel Motad silencers. I think it looks gorgeous against the black frame. I am surprised that more of these haven't been sold. At a tad over 3kg they offer a decent weight saving against the original - apart from all their other benefits. The Mk 2s Andy is now selling are all polished and the front fitting has been altered to take a graphite collar-type seal rather than the metal-to-metal joint as per the unpolished Mk1 version I run on my 325. (UPDATE October 20-17 - sadly these are no longer avaialable)

I also did a few other easy fiddly bits so as to cross some items off "The List" wink

Here is a pic showing progress to date:

Side views 001.jpg

Next big job is to find the petrol leak I had yesterday. Was it the tank tap or the carb float stuck down perhaps?

Brian



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Looking absolutely fantastic. I'm thinking ahead and wondering whether you're going to do an extensive refurb on some 'period' plastics, or are you sticking new or nearly new ones on?

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'94 Yamaha TTR 250 Raid (with Open Enduro headlight, grrr...)

'54 plate Suzuki GSF 650S (Bandit)

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pedrosan wrote:

Looking absolutely fantastic. I'm thinking ahead and wondering whether you're going to do an extensive refurb on some 'period' plastics, or are you sticking new or nearly new ones on?


Good question!

I have reached the point where I am starting to think about what tank, seat, side panels and rear mudguard to use. The bike looked so nice "bare" that it will be easy to spoil it if I get the panels wrong. At the moment I am using whatever comes to hand first as I am keen to take it out for a run to check the gearbox and clutch. I hope the number plate turns up today that I ordered from eBay!

To keep faith with the project, I think I should refurb some old plastics and give them a set of new decals.

With this in mind, I have already have on the shelf a new seat cover and graphics kit from Enjoy Manufacturing in the States. Good quality stuff but I am very nervous of messing up the application of the decals. I might chicken out and ask a mate who says its dead easy wink

I may not get to that today as I am having a bit of a 'mare with a leaking carb. The leak seems to be from around the little plate that retains the accelerator pump diaghragm. I have fitted new O rings and cleaned the surface of the cover with wet and dry 400 grade making sure it stayed dead flat but still it leaks confuse

It's this sort of thing that swallows the time.

Brian



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I didn't touch the carb today. I think I am hoping that the bike faeries might mend it overnight so the next time I switch on the petrol tap it doesn't leak wink

Instead, I got stuck into ticking off items from The List.

I repaired a tail light whose bullet terminals had been chopped and fitted a tail tidy to take it. There has been some interest in making these lately but I cheated and used a Totally TTRs tail tidy off the shelf. These use the same mounting points as the original TTR assembly.

Finishing off 001.jpg

Finishing off 002.jpg

 

Hope the number plate I bought from eBay arrives tomorrow and that will be the rear end finished.

I turned my attention to the forks and handlebars. I fitted the brackets on the fork bolts for the brake line "rings", headlights and indicators. For simplicity, and best visibility on the road, I am going to start off with the original blue TTR indicator set.

The first "white v blue" model incompatibility issue arose with the RH indicator as there was very little room betwen the bracket and the digital speedo idiot lights binnacle. I had to take a lot off the threaded end of the indicator to allow it to fit. See how tight it is below:

Finishing off 004.jpg

Another mis-match was with the headlight. I had bought a brand new "Euro" headlight a few years ago and squirrelled it away for future use. I dug it out today but no way would it fit around the digital speedo head so I had to use the last of my spare "ordinary" TTR headlights instead. This meant making up a connector conversion lead as the white model wiring loom uses a 3-pin spade terminal connector (car type terminals) whereas the blue headlight uses the smaller pins and a 4-way connector. The extra wire on the blue headlight 4-way connector is for the side light which isn't essential.

With headlight, indicators, stop and tail lights all now working, it was on to the front brake. I tried bleeding the front brake using the "reverse" fill method using a syringe but it didn't work for me.

Finishing off 005.jpg

I had to wait until Holby City was over and get Trish to help me bleed the brake the old fashioned way. 

I love the Symtec heated grips so, whilst the bars were bare, I fitted a set. (If anyone needs any Winding Roads products like these grips then let me know and I can get you them at a discount.)

Using some hairspray (not mine I promise!), I slipped on the new open -ended grips. This is a fairly new idea to me and it is an alternative to sawing the ends off a pair of ordinary grips to fit handguards.

Finishing off 007.jpg

I think the TTR is now about ready for a test run. I will have to go back over things like painting the stand, fitting a speedo sensor unit, sorting out some panels to receive the Enjoy Mfg decals and fitting their seat cover to a spare seat, at a later stage.

If the test run is successful and the engine, clutch and gearbox are all OK then my priority will be to get the TTR MOTd so that I can start to enjoy it biggrin

Brian



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Light at the end of the tunnel :)

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'54 plate Suzuki GSF 650S (Bandit)

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Don't know about light at the end of the tunnel, I got full sun at the end of mine biggrinbiggrinbiggrinbiggrin

Just been out on a test run (private roads of course) and it runs beautifully biggrinbiggrinbiggrin

The gearchange is fine, no unwanted noises in any of the gears, the clutch is operating fine and no unwanted noises from the engine wink

I did my usual with a new rebuild and parked it over a sheet of clean cardboard when I got home to test for leaks.

There was a weep of brake fluid from the front caliper so I have tightened the union and bled nipple. Also, there was an oil leak which had me a lot more worried but it was easily solved. I hadn't properly tightened the inspection "discs" on the generator cover disbelief

Feeling very pleased with myself at the moment smile



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Woo hoo Hippy Hoppy - GOOD ONE.

What a result - I am chuffed for you.

I'm pleased all the gears select OK after the original "slight doubt" period. confuse

Good job well done, Brain.

Congrats to you (and Trish the bleeder!)

Martyn



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Thanks Martyn wink

Number plate arrived and MOT booked for Friday morning!!



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Brilliant! How does the 280 kit feel compared to standard? I think you should be well qualified to answer that as you will have ridden pretty much every size engine TTR made! It must be odd on road tyres, I'm guessing its a lot smoother, which might rob some of the sensation of speed perhaps? Great work, I'm looking forward to the plastics and decals. Are you putting whites on it?

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Actually looking closely I just saw a blue tank in one picture. I take it you're doing it blue as per "modernising". The clue is in the title!

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'54 plate Suzuki GSF 650S (Bandit)

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pedrosan wrote:

Actually looking closely I just saw a blue tank in one picture. I take it you're doing it blue as per "modernising". The clue is in the title!


LOL - you got there by yourself Pete!

This was the goal:

"The idea is to see whether I can update an eBlag purchase economically to make it look like the later blue plastic-tanked TTRs. This will mean changing the frame colour to blue or black (as used in 2011 TTRs in Australia) and putting on blue front mudguard, headlight, side panels and rear mudguard."

Just had a visit from Martyn and he has spotted a few bits missing on the project TTR such as caliper guard, swing arm bung, and handguards plus the rusty sidestand cry

The upside was that he helped me bleed the rear brake which is now spot on - so thanks Martyn wink

Regarding the engine, I have only just started to run it in but, I have put on tall 14/44 gearing and didn't notice any hesitation on the road in terms of pulling away and getting quickly into 6th gear so there must be plenty of torque biggrin

Also I didn't notice any real difference with the Avon tyres over my 325 with knobblies - maybe I lack sensitivity no

I got sidetracked into gardening today so haven't done much and probably need to take time out to tidy up the garage and workshop tomorrow as they are both in a bit of a state!

Looking forward to getting it on the road properly if I get the MOT on Friday morning smile

Brian



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Regarding reverse fill method using a syringe I too have found this method not good. However I have used the syringe to suck the fluid slowley out whilst keeping an eye on the reservoir and topping up as I suck. It worked well and I did not need to disturb SWMBO from watching TV.

Well done on the project bike, fascinating read and like finishing a good book, what will we read now its almost ended. 



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Have really enjoyed this thread Brian, gonna miss it when the bike is done!

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Thanks guys - your comments are much appreciated!

I took a bit of time out from gardening duties this afternoon to attend to some of the items Martyn spotted smile

Caliper guard now fitted plus the swing arm "bungs" were installed on both sides of the swing arm. Whilst I was about it I fitted on of our own Totally TTRs shark's fin disc guards  smile

a_rear arm finished.jpg

I noticed that the swing arm decal is beginning to lift at the front around the bung. Anyone recommend how best to get it stuck back down as it has lost its own "stickiness" please?

I fitted one of our new steel racks and took some pics of it for the web page ad but couldn't resist taking a pic of the whole bike whilst I was about it. Excuse the tatty blue panels but I think you can agree that the aim of turning a white TTR into a blue TTR has been met smile

a_nearly_finished.jpg

You can see from the pic that I have fitted a pair of mirrors (as a road bike I will need to know who is following me and behave accordingly!) and I fitted a pair of handguards later plus an original Yamaha engine bar.  

I dug out the Enjoy Mfg decals tonight to remind myself what I have got and they look really good. Just hope I can apply them without spoiling any - plus I hope they look as good on the bike!

I think I could start to get withdrawal symptoms once the project is really finished confuse

Brian



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I'd be afraid to take it out and possibly get it mucky.

Well done, in a few days it'll be better than NEW.

The pipe and silencer set up looks fantastic, as does the rest of the bike.

When you compare the before and after shots, WOW:-

Before pics 004.jpg

13th April 2015.jpg

I can't wait for the finished article.

What would it look like if it wasn't for Totally TTRs

Martyn



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The TTR is now MOTd!

That wasn't without its own trauma. There was no VIN plate on the frame and the powder coating had completely obliterated the VIN number stamped on the headstock. I spent about 20 minutes scraping off powder coating (no easy job I assure you!) until I found it and could make it readable. Made a bit of a mess and I now need to work out how to repair the paintwork cry

A couple of issues during the MOT.

The rear tyre wasn't seated 100% but that was easily fixed with the airline and 70lbs of pressure.

I hadn't tightened one of the throttle cable connectors on the carb disbelief

The new steering head bearings had bedded in a bit and there was slight play but that is also an easy fix and it wasn't bad enough for an "advisory". 

All I need to do now is tax it and I can start to put a few miles on it biggrin

Interestingly, the carb leak has fixed itself smile

I am parking the TTR over a sheet of clean cardboard and no leaks yet so fingers crossed it stays that way.

I fitted a new set of handguards as per the diagram on the packaging but they were pressing down on the front indicators. I have turned the inboard fixing around 180 degrees and that has solved that problem.

I am sure there will be a few more bedding down issues but so far so good wink

Decals next - after a good tidy up in the garage.

Brian



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RE: "Modernising" a 1993 Yamaha TTR250 Open Enduro
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Dare I ask how much money is in it? I'm guessing somewhere north of £2,500 in bike and bits, and a couple of hundred hours? If you value your workshop time at a nominal (and minimal) £25/hour, that would put this bike at £7,500+ !!!! Amazingly, I think its worth it. To have a bike that is ground up restoration perfectly as you want it, well, money alone couldn't have bought it. And the sense of satisfaction must be immense! I've found your next project, I'll send you my bike!

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Keighley, West Yorkshire

'94 Yamaha TTR 250 Raid (with Open Enduro headlight, grrr...)

'54 plate Suzuki GSF 650S (Bandit)

Previously Yamaha YBR125, Yamaha TY125, Yamaha TY250



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pedrosan wrote:

Dare I ask how much money is in it? I'm guessing somewhere north of £2,500 in bike and bits, and a couple of hundred hours? If you value your workshop time at a nominal (and minimal) £25/hour, that would put this bike at £7,500+ !!!! Amazingly, I think its worth it. To have a bike that is ground up restoration perfectly as you want it, well, money alone couldn't have bought it. And the sense of satisfaction must be immense! I've found your next project, I'll send you my bike!


That's a pretty good guess Pete! I did the sums last night and, at trade prices, it was over £2,000 including initial purchase but I am sure I have forgotten a lot of bits and bobs I used like seals, etc. If I was to add in the just the cost of fuel running around various parts of Devon having the soda blasting, spraying, etc, done then the cost goes up.

I reckon you are probably right on the hours as well - at least a couple of hundred hours. I tend to cost myself at £10 an hour as I am not a trained mechanic, work slowly and often have to re-do things disbelief

It was the encouragement here that kept me going on occasions when there didn't seem to be an end in sight wink

I am still spending so the parts and hours together probably will top out at about £4,500 but, I will have a virtually new TTR with oodles of extras and I don't think that sounds too bad. Just don't tell Trish what it has cost confuse 

I think I will park doing another project for a while and hope to get out either trail riding on the 325 or bimbling around some back roads (the A30 toward Okehampton, the A382 through Moretonhampstead and then the B3193 back to Exeter is a great loop)  on the project TTR.

Anyone knowledgable about road bikes can suggest tyre pressures for my Avon Distanzas? I haven't got a clue! I think I am running 25 in the front and 30 in the rear but am guessing for road work I should go higher?

Brian

PS I counted up that I have 13 rolling TTRs here at TTR towers so no room for yours - sorry biggrinbiggrin

 



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TTRfan wrote:
Anyone knowledgable about road bikes can suggest tyre pressures for my Avon Distanzas? I haven't got a clue! I think I am running 25 in the front and 30 in the rear but am guessing for road work I should go higher?

Chancey popped around today and let me have a go on his 325 - lovely bike but needs gearing up - I was in top gear within yards wink

He suggested that I should run my tyres at the pressures recommended in the TTR Owners Manual which made a lot of sense.

They are 21psi in the front and 25 psi in the rear tyre so I need to let some air out.

Brian 



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Hel brake line problem.jpg

A little wrinkle I forgot to mention was a slight weep of brake fluid from the bottom hose union - see pic above.

Despite tightening up it was still leaking when using the front brake but not when just standing.

It took me a little while to suss out that the bottom of the stainless crimp pipe (where arrowed) was tight against the caliper preventing the union seating square and tight. I managed to lever it out a mm or so with a big screwdriver and no further problems. A bit of a design fault as is the rubber ferrule that goes in the clamp. Its too short and fat so needed trimming cry

Chancey's Venhill cable had an elbowed union so they have got it sorted.

Brian



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TTRfan wrote:

That wasn't without its own trauma. There was no VIN plate on the frame and the powder coating had completely obliterated the VIN number stamped on the headstock. I spent about 20 minutes scraping off powder coating (no easy job I assure you!) until I found it and could make it readable. Made a bit of a mess and I now need to work out how to repair the paintwork cry


I decided to use brush on Smooth Hammerite for the repair and its looking quite good. Taking a while to dry compared to ordinary Hammerite though.

Most TTRs suffer from the paint being rubbed off the headstock by the cables and the area going rusty so I am thinking of putting a shaped bit of carbon fibre style film or thick clear protective film over the area that the cables rub.

I put a bit of masking tape over the VIN number and will give it a coat of clear varnish when the Hammerite has properly hardened. However it is very faint so I have ordered a Yamaha VIN plate,as a backup, from here and just hope my mate still has his number punches wink

The blue TTRs have VIN plates but I can't recall seeing them on any purple framed models.

Parking on clean cardboard paid off as there was a tell-tale little puddle of oil under the front of the engine this morning. Soon traced it to the usual suspect - the plug in the compressor hole leaking. My mate with the lathe is still looking at a more permanent solution but has been a bit distracted of late cry

Brian



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The TTR is now in use on a daily basis as a "mule" for Totally TTRs smile

I put a Givi top box on the rack and now have a good excuse for a ride each day taking the Totally TTRs customer packages to the local Post Office biggrin

I never thought I would be using a TTR as a road bike with a top box fitted but it is really useful.

The biggest set back to fitting the top box was getting on and off the TTR. It was only going to be a matter of time before I got it wrong and we both ended up in a heap on the floor.

Having fitted a lowering link to my bro's TTR last week I decided to do the same to mine. Fitted it today - less than half an hour to do - and it made the TTR a lot easier to mount.

The pic below compares the old link to the new.

Fitting a lowering link (4).jpg

To "even up" the suspension a bit, I fitted a pair of handlebar spacers and dropped the forks up through the yokes by 22mm. That seemed to balance things up well enough and the bike still handles fine.

Fitting a lowering link.jpg

I have just picked up a couple of repaired speedo sender units so I can test them on the project bike and keep one of them for myself so that I will at last have a working speedo biggrin

Still need to sort out the leaking decompressor oil plug, graphics (a potentially big job if I do it myself) and perhaps shot blast and powder coat the side stand.

At least I can enjoy riding the bike now and it's nice not to have to power wash it after each trip wink

Brian



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Any chance of a pic of the lowered bike with top box? Fantastic effort to end up with a daily ride from the pile of scrap you started with

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Brian, it's nice to know you're using the bike at last. Congratulations on the beautiful "Ugly Duckling" transformation. (The bike looks nice too) biggrin

Looking at the last picture you posted I was struck by my pedantry! wink

If you look here CLICKY THINGY you may see why, but if not then,

"Displaying your tax disc

Your vehicle tax disc must be displayed on the passenger side (kerb side) of the vehicle’s windscreen. If there’s no windscreen or you have a motorcycle or sidecar, you should display the tax disc on the kerb side of the vehicle."

Martyn



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I know, I know, I know - just as I was fixing the tax disc on I remembered reading about it and in my confused and jumbled mind something made me think I had been putting the disc on the wrong side for all these years so put it on the RHS disbelief

I may, or may not, get the heat gun on it to see if the sticky will release... 

Busy playing with sender connections at the moment confuse



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The engine is nearly run in now so I have been giving it a bit more throttle only to find I had a misfire when opening the throttle wide. If I backed off then things would sort themselves out. Nevertheless, very frustrating!

It seemed to be carb related and I tried 3 different carbs each giving slightly different results but ultimately didn't solve the misfire.

So I swapped out the coil/HT lead, CDi and fitted a new spark plug. No improvement.

I seemed to be left with two possibilities - either valves or the ignition pick up.

I chose the easy option first which was to check the valve timing. I lined up the timing mark on the flywheel and took the cam cover off and was surprised to find the camshafts were one tooth out disbelief

Timing out.jpg

I corrected that and the TTR runs better than ever. I took the opportunity of fitting an indicator buzzer whilst the tank was off and changed the oil and filter after the successful test run biggrin

I really can't explain why the fault coz I am meticulous in checking the camshafts are correctly aligned when rebuilding engines confuse

I still need to get a new seat cover and the Enjoy decals fitted before I take the final pics.

Brian



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wow you have done a lot of work looks like a great job i keep thinking of rebulding my old ttr or 2000 picking up a newer one you given me hope is the motor rebuld that big of a job and are parts hard to find thank great post

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