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Post Info TOPIC: "Modernising" a 1993 Yamaha TTR250 Open Enduro


Super Guru

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"Modernising" a 1993 Yamaha TTR250 Open Enduro
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Recent projects and restorations on other forums have stirred my project juices and so I am going to have a go. 

The idea is to see whether I can update an eBlag purchase economically to make it look like the later blue plastic-tanked TTRs. This will mean changing the frame colour to blue or black (as used in 2011 TTRs in Australia) and putting on blue front mudguard, headlight, side panels and rear mudguard.

This is the little beauty that I am going to lavish my care, attention and time on:

Beforepics004.jpg

Beforepics006.jpg

Beforepics005.jpg

Beforepics009.jpg

Beforepics010.jpg

S969HUBbeforepics3.jpg

S969HUBbeforepics8.jpg

 

The previous owner tried to enhance its natural beauty with a coat of cammo green matt paint over just about everything including forks and gaiters, airbox, swing arm, etc etc. I am not sure that I like the look so will probably try and get back closer to standard Yamaha colours wink

I spoke to the Cullompton powder coaters who only stock silver and anthracite metallics which are mostly used on cast iron domestic radiators apparently. If I want to have a blue metallic then I will have to pay up front for a 20kg of the material. This could cost between £3-400 compared to what they normally pay for plain colours which is £100-150.

I asked the Pinhoe folks as well but they only keep plain colours in stock. They quoted £80 to shot blast and powder coat a frame which sounds reasonable.

I will probably go for black to keep things simple and economical. 

My first job will be to strip the TTR down to the bare frame and do some repairs before getting it powder coated.

The wheels are currently anodised purple and ideally I want silver rims. Is it possible to strip off the anodising easily or should I try and source another pair already the right colour?

Do I keep the engine standard or take it to maximum oversize of 263cc which not only ups the ceecees but ups the compression or go mad and do another 325cc confuse

How do I clean the cammo paint off the engine and how do I get a good finish on it without spending days cleaning up the cases etc?

The seat in the pics isn't the original as I have already stripped the ripped cover off of that one and it will be recovered as soon as I have worked out how to repair the seat foam. Anyone know where to get a block of seat foam? We tried Langhams in Fore St Exeter but upholstery foam just isn't the same.

This is the sort of look I am aiming for biggrin

LE04 lhs.jpg

I have a feeling this could be a lonnggg project..... blankstare



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Started the strip down and gathered up quite a few "ooh nasty"s already as to be expected. Slightly more worrying is the loose bolts on the engine cam cover and elsewhere so I am guessing it will not be in a good state cry

Broken speedo magnet - but why all the grease? Should be dry where it lives confuse

Broken magnet.jpg

Rear chain guard rubber worn right through:
Chain guard.jpg 

What was I saying about purple rims - the rear one is chrome - now what was that off - certainly not a TTR confuse

Chrome rim.jpg

 

Seemed to have had trouble with both frame mountings for the exhaust. Nasty repair on one and the other missing completely:
Exhaust mounting.jpg

Exhaust mount rear.jpg

Not convinced the previous owner was keeping up on his maintenance - no material left on the rear pads but luckily the disc isn't damaged smile

Rear brake pads.jpg

Good stuff wink



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Have had a good go at stripping her out tonight but, in deference to nearby neighbours, had to pack it in at 10pm cry

Some more interesting "finds":

Missing head steady - so there is a 99% certainty the head has been off and, because of the ease in which the other head steady bolts came out, I would think quite recently:
Missing head steady.jpg

 

Shock might be OK - forgot to check it before taking off the rear wheel etc - but a new bump stop is needed - that'll be a pain because I will need to make up a clamp to hold the shock rod to strip it out cry Anyone else done that can give a bit more detail on what's reqired please? Also, anyone got a spare bump stop for a 14mm diameter rod?

Bump stop.jpg

I was probably lucky this time as the swing arm and linkage bolts all came out with only gentle "persuasion".  That'll be a new chain slider needed then
Chain slider.jpg

 

It is always interesting to see how bad the link arm is - unbelievable how bad some can get between MOTs! This one lived up to expectations with a shreaded bearing sleeve. Always good to see someone trying the bronze bush to replace the lower shock bearing. Should be a rose joint - nothing else works as you may be able to spot from the ovalled out centre of the bush
Link arm.jpg

 

Significant bit of corrosion on one of the front engine mount plates
Front engine mount.jpg

 

Surprised how little the loom had been butchered. They usually have all sorts done to them.
Loom.jpg 

Took some pics just to show progress so far

Front.jpg

 

LHS.jpg

 

RHS.jpg 



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I will do my best to keep the thread up to date but I think I have reached a point now where it all slows down cry

Looks like some new fork stem bearings might be needed!

Fork stem bearings.jpg

 

When you put all the bits in a box, it doesn't look much does it?
Box of bits.jpg

 

Anyways up, the frame and engine have been power washed and ready for the next stage. Despite having given the TTR a good power wash before hand, the frame and engine were absolutely filthy. I got in a right mess and will need to smuggle out the house hoover when Mrs TTR isn't around and tidy up the floor where I was working.

Welding needed on the frame and goodness knows about the state of the engine! Got to remember that it still has oil in. Wish I had remembered to drain it before I started work disbelief

 Frame and engine clean.jpg



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Started on the engine after a few excitements balancing the engine on some MX stands to drain the oil evileye  bleh  disbelief

Cam cover off and Hey Presto! I can start to see why the TTR was parked up. One cam gear is missing and its fixing has split. So something traumatic happened to this motor. Looking down the cam chain well I can see the gear lying at the bottom.
Cam gears.jpg

 

Things don't improve. One of the cam bearing cover bolts felt a bit strange and it came out with a section of stripped thread (which initially looked like a Helicoil insert) attached!
Loose helicoil.jpg

 

There are signs of valve damage as two cam buckets are stuck in the "down" position (top of pic) which I reckons indicates a couple of bent inlet valves cry
Cam buckets.jpg

 

Things don't improve. Took out the starter motor and its pinion is wrecked so that's an expensive replacement needed:
Starter pinion.jpg

 

Decided to come indoors for a refreshing cuppa before taking the head off and seeing the extent of the damage. Watch this space wink

 



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Got the head off and my suspiscions confirmed - two open inlet valves indicating bent stems:
Bent inlet valves.jpg

They had hit the piston but have done surprisingly little damage. The left hand arrow shows where the dropped cam gear ended up.
Piston damage.jpg

 

The piston otherwise isn't damaged so it seems that the previous owner had done some maintenance with oil changes etc. However there is evidence of blowby both on the piston and the top of the barrel and, even though there is no discernible wear step in the barrel, it is going to get a rebore and new piston. No point in going this far and not doing it. Might get the biggest oversize Wossner piston kit and take it out to a whopping 263ccs biggrin
Piston.jpg

 

Gotta say that working on the TTRs is made a lot easier by having (most of) the right tools. I use this Bosch impact driver a lot and it saves lots of tedium when taking out or replacing case bolts, etc. Told Mrs TTR it was for household DIY wink
Bosch e-driver.jpg

 

I am guessing that the engine damage has been caused by the cam gear bolts falling out (haven't found them yet) allowing the cam chain to drop into the well and jam (same as happens with a thrown drive chain). The engine obviously turned enough of a revolution for the piston to clobber the open inlet valves. This is the jammed chain:
Jammed camchain.jpg

 

The grandchilder are here now so further investigative activity curtailed until they go to bed.



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Kids in bed so time to start to find the missing bits! Off with the clutch cover and the first cam gear bolt was easy to find sitting proudly atop the oil pump casing. A chunk of alloy was also easily visible sitting next to where the chain broke it off. Took out the sump strainer and nothing on there but I spotted a round white (looks as if that would have been its original colour anyways) plastic bit underneath it that I really don't recognise - which is worrying!
debris.jpg

Off with the clutch next only to find a broken finger - but where is it? 
broken clutch basket.jpg 

 

Need to get a few more bits off to remove the cam chain. Not going to use that one again! A gorilla must have done the nut up on the crankshaft drive gear - needed the help of some extra leverage courtesy of a pair of handlebars to get that one cracked!
Extra leverage.jpg

 

In order to hold gears etc to undo nuts, I used to jam the gears with cloth which was a bit hit and miss. I since discovered a clever little gear jammer which has a magnet to hold it against the gears leaving you with both hands free to undo the nut. 
Gear jammer.jpg 

The chain damage is now obvious but not too bad
chain damage.jpg 

 

Still missing a cam gear bolt so I took off the oil pump next. This is held in place with cross head screws which are impossible to undo with a screwdriver. The previous spanner monkey had used a chisel to get these started if the marks on the screws are anything to go by. This is where an impact driver is worth its weight in gold/petrol/diesel
impact driver.jpg

 

Another Eureka moment as the missing bolt is found nestling behind the oil pump!
missing cam gear bolt.jpg

 

Over now to the generator side as my search for bits continues. Off with the starter gear cover first as a casing bolt sits inside. The large idler gear had an unhappy tale to tell with a chipped tooth which probably happened when the engine came to an abrupt halt and there was a kickback. It sort of matches the starter pinion damage. The smaller starter gear is OK.
chipped tooth on starter gear.jpg 

 

The flywheel came off after a struggle and I was surprised to find the sprag clutch has seized solid on its shaft! I haven't been able to free it yet and will probably end up throwing away the whole assembly as it must have damaged the face the sprag slides on.
jammed sprag clutch.jpg

 

With the ends of the crankshaft unhindered with cogs and stuff, I was able to test for play in the main bearings. Sadly there is enough up and down movement to warrant new ones. Checked the little end by putting in the gudgeon pin and seeing how much it rocked. Not very scientific but it was obvious this little end is knackered. That'll be a new conrod and big end bearing needed then - plus an expensive crank disassembly and rebuild.
testing little end.jpg

 

Next stage is to split the crankcases but at this point I ran out of steam and retired to the safety of the kitchen and a cuppa.....

To be continued......................... 

 



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Mucho colateral damage cry

I could take the easy way out as I have half a dozen other TTR engines in various stages of disassembly that are in a lot better condition than this one having been taken out of service following crashes which have wrecked the frames or have had starter gear problems.

BUT that would defeat the object of a proper resto. I should work with what I am faced with else where is the challenge - or satisfaction when (and if) it all goes back together and runs sweetly?

It is going to be an expensive job though. Even if I don't find any other horrors inside the cases, so far I think I have found I need:

Two inlet valves

Cam chain

Conrod, big end and fitting by a proper engineer - Dave Massam charged nearly £50 for the last one I had done and I supplied all the parts

New piston and rebore

Gasket set

Starter

Large starter gear

Sprag clutch and replacement for the gear it runs on



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I confess to having lost a bit of enthusiasm after my Friday stint on dismantling the engine and I should probably bin the lot but, having got this far, I thought I may as well split the crankcases and see what's inside.

At first sight, there is no obvious problems plus I found the missing bit of alloy broken off by the cam chain
Cases split.jpg

 

Further examination of the individual gears showed no visible damage. A big plus is that all the bearings run smoothly with no obvious play so it looks like, apart from the conrod and main bearings, the rest of the case internals are good to go again.
Cases emptied.jpg

 

There seems a lot more engine parts than I recall from previous strip downs - a full crate this time!
Crate of engine parts.jpg 

 

Need to think of what to do next on the engine but, meanwhile, I have a frame to repair and make ready for powder coating plus a swing arm and linkeage arm to strip down and renew bearings on so I won't be bored wink



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I have to be honest now and fess up. When I bought this shed from eBay it came along with a nearly complete "stolen recovered" TTR with an apparently sound (oh yeah!) engine which is my fall back position.

But, if I rebuild this engine I will know its gonna be good.

I am hoping to keep it as a "clothes horse" for my Totally TTR bits and pieces that fit the older white bikes. This requires using an original whitey engine so that it has the digital speedo drive on the end of the drive shaft. I am hoping to have a bespoke kmh-to-mph converter to sell soon plus I already have special speedo sender covers made for it.

I think I have most of the spare parts needed already in stock for the whole rebuild so it will be good to use some of the bits on my own project. 



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I had the benefit of a skilled welder today and the extra mountings have been welded to the project frame to take the blue plastic petrol tank.

The mountings were "rescued" from a spare frame and I must say Mr Gruff did a magnificent job as it is quite a tricky job reusing old sections of frame in this way! Sadly I spoiled the look of his work by my so-called tidying up and getting a bit over enthusaistic with the Dremel cry

Front tank mount - one on either side:

front tank mount.jpg

 

Rear tank mount - the tank is held in place by a thick rubber strap which hooks over this mounting and uses all my strength to take on and off!
rear tank mount.jpg 

A few other repairs were needed mainly for the broken off exhaust mountings. Very important to get those right.

I put some old bolts in all the threaded holes and the frame is now in the back of the van ready to take for powder coating. I was going to use the Pinhoe folks but a three week wait sounds a bit much. Might ring around - perhaps the Cullompton outfit might be a bit quicker.

A stroke of luck tonight as I have been offered (and accepted) a new conrod, big end bearing, associated washers and big end crank pin at a very reasonable price which means I can get the crank sorted and the engine back together more quickly than anticipated biggrin

In a bout of enthusiasm I knocked out the main bearings from the cases and will fit the new ones as soon as I remember to put them in the freezer to help 'em slip in place........



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Just collected the "280 kit" barrel and piston from Scratch. Not actually 280cc but 263cc but a "280 kit" obviously sold better!

The piston is 2mm oversize which is the biggest you can get. Having seen the finished barrel, I wouldn't want to have gone much farther - it is getting a tad thin! Will see if I can get a picture to show it.

It took 3 bores to get out the meat from the barrel hence I got a hefty bill of £54 to add to the cost of the new piston cry

Thinking very seriously about powder coating the engine cases and head whilst it's all in so many bits...................

Been let down on starter gears and am not sure what I can do now. My order with boats.net was cancelled as Yamaha Japan are out of stock and couldn't give a delivery date.

TTR crank and parts.jpg

New conrod, big end bearing, journal and spacers arrived so they are off to Dave Massam this afternoon for him to work his magic biggrin

Slowly stripping down the swing and linkage arms and every bearing needs replacing. The special swing arm bearing remover made specially for me by that nice Mr Gaschef worked brilliantly and I am looking forward to using the bearing-putting-back-in device he also made for me. Very clever guy wink



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I don't know how clear it is from the pics but the sleeve on the barrel is from the 2mm oversize kit and the sleeve is from a standard bore. Hopefully the extra 13 ceecees will make a difference wink

TTR 2mm oversize barrel 001.jpg

 

TTR 2mm oversize barrel 002.jpg

 

TTR 2mm oversize barrel 003.jpg

I also stripped out the head and the inlet valves were not as Mr Yamaha intended:
Bent valves.jpg 

The head was in remarkably good condition otherwise and it looks as if the valves had only recently been recut and ground in. The valve stem oil seals were also still shiny green and new looking. The only problem, apart from the valves which I have spares of thank goodness, was with a stripped thread on one of the camcap bolts. This was easily sorted with a Helicoil - it's now stronger than the original thread biggrin
Helicoil.jpg

I can't do a great deal more now until I get the frame back from the powder coaters. I took it in on Tuesday 24 May so hope it will be ready soon.

I have ordered some "soft jaws" for the vice so that I can take the rear shock apart without damaging the rod. I have also given in and ordered a pucca flywheel holder as it will be getting a fair amount of use. 

All good fun eh?



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Whilst waiting for the frame to come back from the powder coaters, I took the opportunity of starting to bolt together the empty cases with a view to getting them soda blasted and painted with two pack paint. See http://www.soda-blast.co.uk/

What a nightmare trying to blank off all the orifices where seals etc are removed confuse

I reckon I spent a couple of hours on it and that was without getting the head and barrel on no

POSTSCRIPT - I DISCOVERED ON MY NEXT FRAME POWDER COAT THAT I DIDN'T NEED TO BLANK OFF THE THREADED HOLES ETC AS THIS IS DONE BY THE POWDER COATING FIRM USING TAPERED HEATPROOF "SILICONE" PLUGS!!!

I took a chance and tidy up a couple of big gouges on the cases with Chemical Metal and hope it withstands the soda blasting!

I also started renovating the swing arm using  All Balls linkage repair kits.

The wheels on the project bike aren't very good so I am using the wheels off a white TTR I bought to break for spares. I asked the powder coating firm about doing spoked wheels and they will blast and powder coat for £35 plus VAT a wheel. They will do them in silver and the price includes a coat of lacquer.

To be continued.......................

Powder coated frame now back - excellent job!

Powder coated frame 001.jpg



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Wheels from latest shonker stripped out and ready to go for shot blasting and powder coating tomorrow. It will be 3 weeks ago that I took the frame into Pinhoe and no phone call to say it's ready so I am going to see how the Cullompton folk do with these wheels and if they are a bit quicker!

Although the wheels look real manky, it's only surface rust and it was easy enough to tighten the one and only loose spoke.

Wheels for powder coating 001.jpg

 

Wheels for powder coating 002.jpg

I didn't realise it was almost 3 months ago the engine went away for soda blasting and spraying confuse

I had almost given up on ever getting it back but it is here now and looking quite good. 

The paint I use to touch up engine cases is a CarPlan aerosol SILVER-09 (MET) which is an excellent match. The reference on the can is YAB 186 and a search on the internet shows this colour was used on various Hondas where it is listed as:

NH502M Asturias Grey 1986 1990 Silver-09 - Gunmetal (Met) - YAB186 1 Grey

so that is what has been used with a two pack lacquer finish.

I have pretty much forgotten what the engine was and where the innards are so it will have to wait until I do another workshop tidy up to see what is lurking in the many boxes.

Sprayed engine 001.jpg

Sprayed engine 002.jpg

Sprayed engine 003.jpg

Sprayed engine 004.jpg



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I had a bit of a sick feeling looking at the pics as the engine has a number meaning it's from a later blue model with a 7-plate clutch and I have had it sprayed with the earlier narrower 6-plate clutch cover fitted disbelief

Picked up the wheels from ICS in Cullompton.

They look really good and transformed the nasty objects that I took in. But.... there was a back blob of something in a visible arae on the rear wheel which wouldn't come offcleanly so its being blasted and painted again. Got home with the front wheel only to see that some grease had bled from the bearings and spoiled the finish.

Powder coated front wheel 1.jpg

 

Powder coated front wheel 2.jpg

 

I had hoped to save the seals and bearings on the front wheel but that is not going to be possible as I am going to have to strip them out and degrease the wheel so that the same problem doesn't happen again.

£80 plus VAT for the pair of wheels so I am keen they get it right!

PS Wheels back again now and looking good!



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Things have gone a bit quiet here at TTR Towers so I have dug out the frame and started work on the project TTR again.

Started off with a bit of a tedious job which was to run re-threaders through all of the captive nuts, etc. to make sure that all the threads are clean from the powder coating.

I haven't rebuilt a bike from a bare frame before so am not sure of the best approach. I think it will be useful to get a rolling chassis so will start with the front end - forks and handlebars - and then get the swing arm and rear wheel in.

I am replacing the steering head bearings with new using an AllBalls kit
30 November 2011 008.jpg 

Before I can look at fitting forks, I needed to remove the old outer bearing races. This job is a lot easier using the correct tool wink

After I published this message, I was given some excellent advice on how to remove an outer bearing race which will be scrap and that is to put a blob of weld on its surfave from an arc welder (and probably other types) and the race will drop out when it cools and contracts biggrin

30 November 2011 005.jpg

It is a pretty solid bit of stainless steel with four sprung "tongues" that sit under the races and allows them to be driven out with a hammer. The following pic shows the tool in place ready to drive out the top race.
30 November 2011 002.jpg 

I am a bit worried about the amount of rust and grit still falling out of the frame drain holes left over from when the frame was shot blasted.
30 November 2011 006.jpg 

Slow progress but hope things will move on a bit quicker tomorrow. It is often the starting of a job that is the most difficult smile



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It's a good job that I have got a bit of time coz it took me a long time to do what I thought was a simple job which was to fit new steering head bearings and the fork yokes disbelief

I guess the easy bit was fitting the new inner races to the fork head on the frame. The top race is easy as it fits flush. I used a copper headed hammer to tap it in.
Fitting the fork yokes 5 December 2011 001.jpg

The bottom race is recessed so I used an old inner race to tap it home. A lot easier with a bare frame coz I could just turn it over biggrin Not so easy with a complete bike!
Fitting the fork yokes 5 December 2011 003.jpg 

This is where it got difficult - getting the old bottom bearing off. It was incredibly tight. I started off using a chisel to get in between the bearing and yoke to start to drive it off.
Fitting the fork yokes 5 December 2011 004.jpg

Once it had started to move it was a case of continuing to drive it off wiith the hammer and chisel. Easier with the old roller bearings removed.

In retrospect I should have cut it off with a Dremel.
Fitting the fork yokes 5 December 2011 005.jpg

 I guess I should have realised that if the old bearing was tight the new one would be as well - this was the case cry   In retrospect I should have warmed the bearing and chilled the yoke to have made it easier. I eventually ended up whacking it on in the vice using the old inner race to protect the new bearing. Having got the bearing fully home, it was then a nightmare getting the old bearing race off no

After I published this message, I was given some excellent advice which is to cut across the old bearing first so it won't be such a tight fit, can't jam and will easily pop out again biggrin
Fitting the fork yokes 5 December 2011 006.jpg

It would have helped having three hands to do the next bit. Having greased the bearings well, it was a case of putting the yokes back in the frame with all the washers etc all in the correct order - the workshop manual is really good for this sort of job. Needless to say I managed to mess this up and forgot to fit the new bearing seal. It took a couple of goes to get it all together in the right order with no bits left over wink

Fitting the fork yokes 5 December 2011 009.jpg

I am going to wait until I have the forks and front wheel in before torquing up the top nut.

Next job will be to put in the rear swing arm to balance the weight of the frame to stop it toppling forward on its stand.



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The garage is full of TTRs so, until I can sell one or two and make some room, I am back in the workshop and moving the resto project on wink

The swing arm has been thoroughly stripped, cleaned, resprayed and fitted with new swing arm bearings and seals, end caps, side decals and a new chain slider.

I am spoilt by having the AllBalls kit and slider on the shelf here at TTR Towers but the AllBalls swing arm kit includes everything but the end caps or covers so I paid Mr Yamaha a silly amount of money for two new ones - http://www.boats.net/parts/detail/yamaha/Y-30X-2219X-00-00.html

The swing arm bolt has been cleaned and so the swing arm is all ready to fit biggrin

PS I have a spare Raid frame in stock at the moment so, out of interest, I checked and the alloy OE swing arm fits. It would seem that Raid owners could usefully swap their iron swing arm for the alloy one if they want to save a few lbs. Anyone ever tried it?

Swing arm and bolt.jpg



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The swing arm only took a few minutes to fit ..... and then the realisation dawned...... I hadn't refurbed the linkage arm. Not my favouritest job cry

One problem with long running projects is that, no matter how carefully you pack stuff away, parts get lost. This was the case with the linkage so I thought, to be fair to the project, I would pick a manky swing arm and use the linkage from that.

The first bolt on the link arm was well stuck in. The technique I have found works is to undo the bolt about quarter of an inch and then start to beat the main bolt through with a wide punch on the bolt head. Keep spraying any exposed parts of the bolt with WD40 to help things along. That usually gets it moving after which you can use a decent wide round bar to drift out the bolt. I used an old link bolt which, of course, fitted perfectly. Make sure you clean it up well and lube it so you don't get it stuck as well smile
Linkage arm refurb 006.jpg

Linkage arm refurb 008.jpg

The linkage certainly looked ripe for repair! The nut was very difficult to get off no
Linkage arm refurb 009.jpg

Lever out the old seals to get access to press out the bearings. These were definitely past their best.
Linkage arm refurb 010.jpg

I use two sockets in the vice to press out the old bearings. Use a bit of heat if they are really corroded in. 
Linkage arm refurb 011.jpg

The bearings on the link arm are a bit different as there are two with a space in between - simialr to the swing arm bearings. I use a sharp edged s/s drift to drive these out.
Linkage arm refurb 012.jpg

I alway struggle to get out the rusty wire circlips on the shock bearing. I use a centre punch to bend or break the circlip.
Linkage arm refurb 016.jpg

and then prize the broken bits out with a small "glasses" screwdriver

Linkage arm refurb 017.jpg

The shock bush was well stuck so I had to use the blow torch to get it moving.

Linkage arm refurb 014.jpg 

I then gave the linkage a good scrape and wire brush. A mate gave me a stainless steel wire brush and it's brilliant!

These are the only parts you need to keep if you are using an AllBalls linkage kit as all the other parts, including the shock bearing, are in the package.

Linkage arm refurb 019.jpg

To be continued............ 



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A little bit more progress this morning!

The linkage arm parts were left soaking in TFR overnight and I cleaned and dried them before starting assembly. 

The AllBalls linkage kit is very comprehensive and includes the lower shock bearing:

linkage refurb1.jpg

Today was a reverse of last time and I used the vice and sockets to press in the new bearings.
linkage refurb2.jpg

It's a lot quicker to put it all back together than to strip the linkage down. It was soon all done with new bearings and seals installed along with lots of grease:

linkage refurb4.jpg


It was easier to turn the frame upside down to install the refurbed linkage and torque up the nuts and bolts.

linkage refurb5.jpg 

The next job is to find where I put the shock absorber disbelief and get that installed smile



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I took a punt on a shock absorber from eBay and it looked pretty manky when I unpacked it but, after a bit of scrubbing, it came up very nicely. The adjusters aren't seized seem to work OK but the only real check on its condition will be when its used. Saved sorting out the old one - which I still can't find disbelief

Fitting shock1.jpg

Fitting shock2.jpg

A tip. If you don't want to have to take the battery and battery box out to remove the top shock bolt then put it in the opposite way to Mr Yamaha as per pic below:
Fitting shock3.jpg

The project is now beginning to look more like a bike now! Rear wheel next I think so that the frame doesn't keep trying to fall off the stand blankstare
Frame with shock fitted.jpg

Trouble is there are too many distractions. The biggest one is the grandsons aged 2 and 3 years - little darlings! Mackenzie, the older one, loves bikes and tries to ride his toy ones with disastrous consequences and a couple more bike repair jobs for me:
Little bikes.jpg 



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Hi Brian,

Any idea if the adjustable rear shock, and the ally swingarm from the OE are the same fitments as those on the Raid? I might swap mine over at some point

Mark

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I got a spare Raid frame and tried the alloy swing arm in it before I fitted it to the OE frame and it went in fine. 

The top shock mount on the Raid shock is different to the OE (a better design I think) but the width is the same. The inside width of the mounting on the Raid frame is also the same as the OE and the bolt is the same so you can draw your own conclusions wink

Anyone on the forum tried it?

Brian



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Instead of getting cold and wet out trail riding with Martyn and Gruff, I spent some more time on the project bike in my warm workshop, fair weather rider that I am disbelief

As I said, next up was to get the rear wheel together and in the bike. Both wheels had been shot blasted and powder coated as shown earlier in this thread.

First off was to fit bearings and seals. The AllBalls kit contains all you need - the 3 bearings and 2 seals. I had a small driver made up to put in the bearings without damaging them but it is possible to use a socket. Just don't hit on the centre race or you will b*gger the bearing cry
a rear wheel rebuild 001.jpg 

Nice easy job and bearings and seals were soon all nicely greased up and fitted:
a rear wheel rebuild 002.jpg

a rear wheel rebuild 003.jpg

Although the centre of the hub had been protected from the powder coating, I had forgotten to put bolts in the disc bolt holes so had to get the re-threader out to clear the threads:
a rear wheel rebuild 004.jpg

I am spoiling myself and using a new type of rear disc with countersunk holes so that I can use torque-headed counter sunk disc bolts. These are much less likely to round off when I need to change the disc. The standard bolts chew up much too easily. The bolts were then torqued up as per the manual:
a rear wheel rebuild 005.jpg 

Another senior moment followed as darned if I could find my sprocket bolts disbelief

This meant digging out another rear wheel and robbing the bolts off it after which I threw them in the parts washer to soak and called it a day!

I am going to use the restored bike only on the road as a test bed for bits and pieces so am going to fit road gearing. I have had the engine bored out to its limit using the "280 kit" so I think the TTR should easily pull 14/44 gearing. If I don't get any interruptions I hope to get the rear sprocket fitted tomorrow. Getting the tyre on without chipping the powder coating on the rim will be a challenge confuse

I might have to use the "walk the tyre on" method which doesn't involve tyre levers. We shall see wink

PS Just proof read this message and realised I have made a BIG mistake. Did anyone else spot that I didn't mention putting in the spacer between the bearings dohevileyeblehashamed

Ah well, that is now first job tomorrow. Sadly it isn't possible to remove a bearing without damaging it so I hope I got a spare kicking around as I don't want to open another kit to get one cry



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Ok - first thing to do today was remove the seal and bearing to allow insertion of the forgotten spacer - once I had managed to find a spacer no

I bought a bearing removal kit a few years back only to find the 22mm insert needed to get the TTR rear bearings out wasn't in the kit and wasn't available anywhere as an "extra". A friend with a lathe turned me up one in stainless and it makes removing the rear bearings a lot easier.

It's a very basic system where you put the insert in the bearing and force the centre apart with a long screwdriver ended punch. The pic below shows the bearing coming out on the insert.

aRebuilding rera wheel 001.jpg

This is the kit with my special insert. I hope that I have explained how it works clearly enough!
aRebuilding rera wheel 002.jpg

Once the spacer was cleaned, greased and put in place it was a simple job to bolt on the new 44 tooth sprocket. I have a couple of good s/h ones in stock but, as I am also going to fit a new chain, I prefer to have it running on new sprockets front and rear. 

aRebuilding rera wheel 003.jpg

Getting the Avon Distanzia on without chipping the powder coating was a challenge. It is surprising how much stuff is needed! This is the key to the pic below:

A - Tyre paste

B - Valve puller to make getting the valve stem through the rim

C - Rim protectors - can only be used for a few tyre fitting operations which unfortunately doesn't include the most difficult 12" of tyre going over the rim cry

D - Buzetti tyre levers are great! They really are a great help in preventing pinching the inner tube

E - ratchet spanners are really useful for the valve and rim lock nuts as they are in such a restricted area

F - rubber mallet is very useful for bashing the tyre over the rim without damaging the rim

aRebuilding rera wheel 006.jpg

I realise that I still have to renovate the rear caliper but slipped the wheel in the swing arm anyways and it weights the frame down nicely.

aRebuilding rera wheel 007.jpg

I cleaned and sprayed the snail adjusters. I would like to make the numbers clearer and thought this would do it but it hasn't. Anyone got a solution please?
aRebuilding rera wheel 008.jpg 

I think I will start on the forks next so that I can mount the front wheel.



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get a little paint brush some red paint, (enamel) paint a blob on each number keep an eye on it. When it starts to set up and you can touch the paint and leave a finger print, get a clean rag, some thinners and GENTLY start to wipe the paint off - patience will reward you with redpaint only in the numbers.
Very inspiring write up Brian, this will be nicer than anything that ever rolled out of Yamaha when its done!


keep it up Mate!


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Not tried Matt's red paint trick on the snail cams yet but sounds a good 'un - thanks mate smile

Not much progress to report since the last update but I have managed to strip down the forks and clean and spray up the legs.

I haven't taken any photos of the strip down as I can't improve on Kenny's "show and tell" here 

The pic below shows where I am tonight - zillions of bits! Will I be able to put it all together tomorrow? We shall see........

PS Did I say I don't like repairing forks no

Fork rebuild.jpg



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Forks - legend of parts.jpg

It is sometimes difficult to cross reference descriptions in the workshop manual to the real thing so I hope the following pic and legend will help:

1 - outer fork tube

2 - inner fork tube

3 - Damper rod assembly with rebound spring still attached

4 - damper rod

5 - oil lock piece

6 - base valve

7 - fork spring

8 - cap bolt

9 - spring seats

10 - collar

11 - plain washer

12 - slide metal

13 - piston metal

14 - oil (red) and dust (black) seals - I used an AllBalls kit 

So, today's task was to re-assemble a pair of forks for the project bike. Did I say I don't like doing forks? Anyways up, I got my bro' to come and help as two brains are better than one. Even that didn't help as you will see from my "warts and all" account of the process blankstare

I printed off pages 6-40 to 6-45 of the manual to use as reference.

First job was to put the oil lock piece (5) on the end of the rod (3 and 4) assembly, insert it into the inner fork tube (2) and put the whole lot down inside the outer fork tube (1). The idea is to then screw in the base valve (6) to the threaded end of the damper rod - not an easy task and it took us a while although made easier with the electric drill.

Fork rebuild 004.jpg

We didn't have a damper rod holder so relied on putting a bit of sideways pressure on the inner rod to stop the outer tube (4) from turning. 

Fork rebuild 005.jpg

Once done it was time to fit the slide metal (12), plain washer (11) and seals (14) in the order shown below:

Fork rebuild 006.jpg

The slide metal was quite a tight fit and we had to use a punch to get it in place:
Fork rebuild 007.jpg

Don't forget to put in the plain washer (we did on the first fork coz we were following the workshop manual and it didn't mention it cry).

The seals were easy enough. We used an old seal packet with a bit of fork oil on to save damaging the seal lips. Double lip faces down on the red oil seal as shown in pic:

Fork rebuild 009.jpg

Fork rebuild 010.jpg

We used a spare plain washer to put over the seals before tapping them in place with a bit of Wickes finest guttering pipe:

Fork rebuild 011.jpg

This is the part number if you want to buy a section:

Fork rebuild 014.jpg

Next to fit was the retaining spring clip. Why aren't they made of stainless steel so they don't rust?
Fork rebuild 015.jpg

To start off we just put in 500cc of fork oil. In retrospect we could have put in the full 550cc especially as, writing this, I realise we forgot to top up with the extra 50cc disbelief

Fork rebuild 016.jpg

We then followed the instructions in the manual to pump the damper rod slowly up and down 10 times to distribute the fork oil. Then we pumped the inner fork tube (10) slowly up and down (no more than 150mm) and waited a few minutes for the air bubbles to disperse - all as per workshop manual.

Now checked the oil level and adjust to 130mm as per manual. To help with this process we fixed a cable tie tightly to a screwdriver shaft.

afork rebuild 018.jpg

It was then a simple job to slowly top up the oil until it just showed on the end of the screwdriver.
afork rebuild 019.jpg

Next up was to fit a retaining wire on the damper rod so as not to lose it down the tubes! Then fit the spring (7), spring seats (9) and collar(10) by threading them over the wire:
Fork rebuild 018.jpg 

I am not sure why I stopped taking pictures at that point but my excuse is that I was distracted by fork oil leaking out the bottom of the fork.

Fork rebuild 017.jpg

I tried tightening up the base valve (6) with the windy gun but it didn't stop the leak.

We therefore had to drain the oil and strip the fork to sort this out and also to fit the forgotten plain washer underneath the seals.

Having drained out 99% of the oil into the measuring jug, I put it safely out of the way toward the back of the bench and then got called away to the telephone.

When I got back I found my bro' mopping up the oil. He had tried draining a bit more from the fork into the jug and had managed to tip it over the bench. This job wasn't going well. Did I say I don't like doing forks?  disbelief 

After stripping the fork, I had a look at where the leaking base valve sits at the bottom of the outer fork and remembered having had to drill out a seized base valve. I had clearly gone too far and drilled into the valve seat and hence the leak - see pic below. I now have to think on the best remedy. Any thoughts guys? 

Fork rebuild 019.jpg

At least I can take the final sequence of pics when I rebuild this fork wink

Hey ho!

Brian



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I think I have an idea - I cant think of the brand name of it, I think its called "liquid metal", its a two pack product you can mix and you can literally drill and tap it. Id cut a strip of beer can to form a "ring" to place inside seat and form a mold, cover it with some grease (or cling film) so the liquid metal doesnt stick to it, then carefully fill the hole with liquid metal, mixed per manufacturers instructions. If you use the product it is imperitive that the bonding sufaces are clean and oil free - or it wont stick. I have used it on a seal face on an E-type - it worked like a charm. it will stop your leak for sure! ping me if you want more details. Good luck, keep it going mate the end line is in sight!

Matt



-- Edited by matteo on Saturday 4th of February 2012 01:46:14 AM

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Thanks Matt - - I think you have the easiest solution.

I am also now thinking of using Chemical Metal.

The best engineering solution would probably be to take it around to a mate to see if he can cut back to a flat surface on his lathe.....

I would like to get it done sooner rather than later though.

Brian



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here it is Brian,

I remembered when I woke up J. B. Weld

http://jbweld.net/products/jbweld.php if you cant get it or something similar let me know and I can send you some

Matt

Click Here

-- Edited by Cubber on Saturday 4th of February 2012 03:32:02 PM

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Thanks for the info and kind offer Matt but I think my Chemical Metal is much the same and I think will do the trick wink

OK - so the task for today was to fill the holes on the base valve seat so that I could get a seal.

I am using Chemical Metal as a strong filler. I am also using a socket covered in cling film to spread the filler in the holes and not leave me too much to rub down.
aFork rebuild 001.jpg

I applied the filler sparingly with a small screwdriver blade.

aFork rebuild 002.jpg

 I spread the filler flat with the cling-film covered socket:
aFork rebuild 004.jpg

It took a couple of applicatons to build the filler up level with the rest of the valve seat.

The copper washer had been quite badly damaged and I was very lucky to find a new one which is a very close match lurking in a box of "assortments"

aFork rebuild 009.jpg

The next job was to find some way of smoothing off the filler. I tried wrapping the base valve with some sandpaper and rubbing in a circular motion
aFork rebuild 011.jpg 

That seems to work but is going to take some time and patience

aFork rebuild 013.jpg

However, I got called away to pick up Mrs TTR from down town so have stopped there for today with quite a bit still to do. cry

Brian



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It took a lot of work with the sandpaper (and a bit of help from Dr Emel) but I think I am there now. With the help of the new copper washer I think this is going to be OK.

aFork rebuild 017.jpg

The chemical metal has done a good job.

I guess I will only know if I have solved the problem when the fork is back together again and full of oil.

Brian



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I think you may already know this but if the copper washer is a plain type one then its worth annealing it to soften it as they do age harden.
Hold washer over a gas flame with a piece of wire until cherry red and then dunk in a cup of cold water, just be careful not to heat too long as it will melt so as soon as cherry dunk it.
Nice soft annealed washer, I used to do this at work when refitting diesel injectors and they never leaked.

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I rebuilt the "leaky" fork leg today. I won't go through the whole thing but pick up where I left off with the blog except to say that I put the base valve in with a new annealed copper washer and, so far, no leak biggrin

Having fitted the main fork spring (7), spring seats (9) and collar(10) by threading them over the wire, I pulled up the damper with the wire and screwed on the cap bolt (8) using a 17mm open-end spanner on the lock nut.

afork rebuild 020.jpg

It was then a simple job to screw the cap bolt into the inner fork tube (2) and job done - phew smile

afork rebuild 024.jpg

Just need to dig out a pair of new gaiters and get the forks fitted to the frame.

Brian



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I reckon it might be ready for summer Martyn - but not saying which year! The tricky bits are still to come wink

Meanwhile I did a nice easy job on the snail cams as recommended by Matt. I stupidly forgot to take a "before" pic but I got one "work in progress" and one of the finished articles.

I used black instead of the red that was recommended but it is still a great improvement.

Snail cams.jpg

Snail cams finished.jpg

I wasn't happy with the slightly manky and over-long standard sprocket bolts so have sourced some nice shiny chrome countersunk nuts and bolts to use instead.

These have a bigger nut (13mm) and socket head so hopefully will be easier to get on and off. They are also the exact length with no overhang wink

Originals here
Chrome sprocket bolts 001.jpg

New bolts here
Chrome sprocket bolts 005.jpg

Chrome sprocket bolts 006.jpg 

Brian



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Limited progress as we have house guests cry

Managed to sneak out into the workshop and fit a new set of Polisport gaiters and then fit the forks to the yokes.

Next on the agenda will be to build the front wheel up as I can then fit handlebars and be able to move the bike if need be.

Forks fitted.jpg



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I have put the front wheel together and fitted it. All seems fine!

I won't go into great detail on fitting the tyre but would just mention that I used a new rim tape and rim lock as per pics below plus I replaced the standard rim lock flat washer and steel nut with a neat little black aluminium rim lock nut and washer kit. The washer is shaped to sit nicely on the rim and the long "closed end" nut stops the threaded end of the rim lock rusting biggrin

Front_wheel_build 001.jpg

Front_wheel_build 002.jpg

Also, I use a neat little valve puller tool to ease the inner tube valve through the rim. I have big hands and this can be a very frustrating job doing it conventionally no
Front_wheel_build 003.jpg

Once the tyre was on, I fitted the bearings and seals from an AllBalls kit. For owners of white TTRs with a digital speedo, it is worth noting that the AllBalls kit only includes the LH seal as it is made to fit the later blue TTRs which have a speedo drive on the RH side instead of the plain spacer. Therefore an additional seal is needed for white TTRs.

I cleaned out the disc mounting holes in the hub with a thread cleaner to clear the powder coating and cleaned up and sprayed the disc bolts silver. I used a new wavy disc and it all looks pretty good although I would prefer to have used chrome or stainless disc bolts.

Front_wheel_fitting 007.jpg

On the RH side, I replaced the original rusty Nyloc nuts on the axle retaining plate with some domed chrome nuts. Not entirely happy as I had to use a plain washer plus a spring washer to pack them out as they aren't deep enough to tighten up else. I am going to revisit this and may shorten the studs. I would prefer not to have to use the spring washers as it looks a bit odd.
Front_wheel_fitting 004.jpg

It is starting to look more like a bike now so I have temporarily added a pair of handlebars and, if necessary, I can now move the rolling frame out of the workshop.
Front_wheel_fitting 003.jpg


Front_wheel_fitting 006.jpg

Must remember to go back and tighten the steering stem head nut plus fit the rubber plug in the centre spindle to stop water getting in at a later stage. Not sure why the plug is missing confuse

I am not used to seeing TTRs on road-orientated rubber and it is taking a bit of getting used to. They look so much better on aggressive dirt tyres!

I think the next step is to fit the wiring loom. I have given it a swill around and a bit of a brush up in the parts washer (in which I use TFR as I don't like the smell of the usual cleaning agent). It has had a good rinse and is now hanging up to dry.

I remarked earlier when I stripped out the TTR that it hasn't been too badly messed around with so I am hoping it will be a nice simple job to tidy it up and attach it to the frame. I haven't got a white OE here at the moment so will have to use a blue one to show me where and how the loom fits.

Brian



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Livotlout wrote:

With regard to the four nuts to the lower right front fork leg, I personaly would source new nyloc nuts , maybe in stainless, simply because, firstly they are only to be tightened to 10Nm, and secondly when tightened as per manual the lower two are tightened onto a cap that 'gaps' from the fork leg.                                                                                                                          


That is good advice Alec - I just read the owners manual and you are absolutely right!

It says:

"Tighten the upper axle holder nuts. Then tighten the lower ones.

When tightened in this sequence there should be a gap formed at the bottom of the axle holder. 

Axle holder nut torque 10Nm"

I may well go down the s/s Nyloc route as I am sure I got a box of those somewhere in the garage wink

Brian



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Did some work on the wiring loom today.

The headlight end looks OK with all the right terminal blocks attached.
aWiring_loom1.jpg

I took the protective flexi tube and insulating tape off the main wire run and, although pretty dirty, everything appears to be OK.
aWiring_loom2.jpg

Having cleaned up the wires, wrapped them in insulating tape and replaced the flexi tube, I started going through the connector blocks.

First up was to replace a dodgy looking screw-type connector with the correct connector block. The brown and yellow wires connect to the brake switch.

Whatever it is, it can now connect properly. Note the "quick fix" (purple arrow) to over-ride the clutch switch. Not recommended!
aWiring loom3.jpg

It is difficult to remove terminals from their blocks without the correct tool.
aWiring_loom4.jpg

It is possible to buy connector blocks and terminals from the likes of Vehicle Wiring Products that match the standard Yamaha terminals exactly.
aWiring_loom5.jpg

Next up was to replace the horn terminals with the correct "flag" ones. I have not used these before so it is highly likely I didn't crimp them correctly! However, the wires are in tight so I am hopeful they will be OK.
aWiring_loom6.jpg

aWiring_loom7.jpg
 

The only other connector needing attention was the one that connects to a mini-loom with earth terminals that run to the battery and the starter motor - the red bullet connector on the left in the pic. This is a special Yamaha connector that I haven't been able to find from any other supplier so I had to raid another loom for it.

aWiring_loom8.jpg

At this point, my 3-year old grandson burst into the workshop so that was as much as I could do for today!

Brian



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matteo wrote:

Good to see you back Brian! I was having withdrawal symptoms!


Couldn't let you down Matt so I spent a short while on the project bike this afternoon. I made a start on fitting the loom which is actually a lot easier than I thought especially as I wheeled another TTR alongside so I could see where the spaghetti all went wink

The loom is now in place and I fitted the coil and cleaned up and fitted the regulator/rectifier. I think the next step will be to sort out an ignition switch and refit the handlebars. I can then start attaching the controls, switches and headlight assembly. That should be interesting

aWiring Loom fitting.jpg

As seems to be the case with my work on the bike I got distracted again - but in a very nice way wink

Mrs TTR returned from collecting a supply of frame guards we had made up especially for Totally TTRs by Works Connection in the States. I couldn't wait to unpack the box and try a set of guards on the project bike. I may be biased but I think they look very good and protect quite a bit of the frame:

Works Connection frame guards 006.jpg

Works Connection frame guards 007.jpg

I hope to get a bit more done tomorrow but I think I probably need to get the bead blaster I have borrowed working first. There are quite a lot of tarnished parts that need a good clean up before going back on the bike. I have a feeling that could take quite a while as I have never used one before let alone set one up from scratch with no instructions confuse

Brian



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pedrosan wrote:

LLike the guards, are they going up for sale soon?


 Yep - got a big box full to sell - ALL NOW SOLD!

They seem expensive but MotoWard used to sell these Works Connection guards for £72.99 plus p&p - I know coz I bought the last pair of "new old stock" from them. 

Brian



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I took some time out today to get the sandblast cabinet working. As it happened it was all rather easy - just wished I had done it before!

I bought a decent compressor which I was (correctly) assured would run the sandblast eqpt.

Sandblaster 001.jpg

The rest of the kit has been stored for a while and I had to refit the perspex in the window.

Sandblaster 004.jpg

Sandblaster 011.jpg

The air extraction unit was essential as I found when I started sand blasting with it switched off disbelief

Sandblaster 005.jpg

A couple of befores and afters

Sandblaster 006.jpg

Sandblaster 007.jpg

 

Sandblaster 008.jpg

Sandblaster 009.jpg

Not bad eh?

The sand may be a bit aggressive for alloy parts so I might buy some glass beads for it - or maybe soda crystals...

Brian



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The glass beads arrived today and I finished wiring up some sockets for the cabinet and extractor plus I have properly installed the compressor in the garage. Nearly ready to play again!

Meanwhile I wanted a quick win on the project bike so decided to fit an ignition switch - a nice simple self-contained task wink

I have either lost or sold the original unit so decided to fit an after-market switch that I have sourced that seems to be a good replacement. Here it is with the other parts I needed.

Ignition switch and parts 005.jpg

First off was to fit a new rubber grommet - part # 90480-24222. I am sure the original will turn up now I have bought a new one!

Fitting_ignition_switch 002.jpg

The wires are soldered onto the Yamaha switch but the after market switch needs a couple of ring terminals to be fitted.

Fitting_ignition_switch 003.jpg

The switch is a snug fit in the frame grommet. The switch's backing nut that sits inside the frame has to be wound in or out to get the right amount of thread protruding to fit the retaining ring such that the switch is flush.

Fitting_ignition_switch 004.jpg

It is then just a case of screwing on the retaining ring. I did mine up hand tight and I think it should be OK.

Fitting_ignition_switch 005.jpg

Moving around to the LH side, I fitted a new cover - part # 4GY-82568-01-00. I needed to use a bit of gentle persuasion to make sure the wires fitted into the cover neatly. There is quite a bit of spare cable so it was then just a case of plugging the switch terminal block into the loom.

Fitting_ignition_switch 009.jpg

I won't be able to check I have used the correct terminals on the switch (they don't seem to be marked in any way) and will have to wait until the battery is fitted so that I can check it out. It will be simple enough to swap terminals if it is wrong. 

Brian



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I am going to bore you a bit longer about the blast unit. I cleaned out the sand from the hopper and refilled with the glass beads and had a go on some parts I had blasted with sand.

First pic is of the sand blasted sections:
Blasting 002.jpg

2nd pic is of the areas balsted with glass beads:
Blasting 003.jpg 

It seems to give a sort of satin finish which I like.

I am looking forward to using it on the carb biggrinbiggrinbiggrinbiggrin

Brian



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OK - in addition to setting up the blast cabinet I actually did a bit of work on the project.

I picked the mankiest looking rear brake assembly out of the spares box and was feeling a bit nervous as to what condition it would be in:

Blasting 004.jpg

As I suspected, the caliper pins were seized in so, rather than rounding them out by forcing them with the allen key, I had a go with the impact driver and they both moved and then screwed out fine:
Blasting 005.jpg 

I think I struck lucky because the caliper halves were moving freely and the slide pins still had grease on them and were relatively rust free:Blasting 006.jpg 

If the pins and rubbers had been damaged then I would have bought replacement parts using the guide here. Just scroll down a bit and you will find Kevin Baker's excellent information wink

After a lot of scraping, scrubbing in the parts washer, and wire brushing I finished the parts off in the blaster (you knew I would!) and I am very pleased with the result:
Blasting 009.jpg 

I will work out tomorrow what to do next to preserve a clean surface on the steel parts. I am tempted to spray the alloy parts with clear lacquer to give some protection from corrosion but is that a bit OTT confuse

Brian



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So glass beads are used to "pean" surfaces, often used on aerospace parts , and aeroplane parts too. What works really well on the mankiest of parts is a good soak at least overnight in a jar or container of acetone. It softens up all the crud so you dont have to blast so much. even glass beads can change the shape and size of ali parts..... message here....move slowly with Ali!

Matt



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I would like to get the handlebars on so that I can get the bike out of the workshop for the pics.

The project has been put on the backburner whilst I rebuilt and refelted the shed roof plus my car failed the MOT yesterday so I have to do some repairs to get it legal again asap. The mundanity of everyday life eh no

Hopefully, I might get the pics at the weekend.

The reason I went for a black frame was that the powder coaters didn't have a metallic blue and were only offering flat colours. I chose black because the new TTRs bein sold in Australia have black frames and it looks quite good with the blue plastics that I am going to use. My guess is that it would also look good on the white models.

Brian 



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Blasting 009.jpg

Well, at long last I managed to put in a couple of hours on the project bike! My target was to paint, re-assemble and fit the rear brake assembly pictured above.

I immediately hit a snag when I tried to remove the rear axle. It took a bit of persuading. After cleaning off the grease I discovered what looked like a bit of weld spatter on the spacer.

rear-brake 001.jpg

I filed off the nib and the axle moved freely again.

I used a small artist paint brush to put a coat of Hammerite grey on the exposed steel parts of the caliper and master cylinder and sprayed the spring, pads and fixing plate.

I am very impatient and kept messing up the paint finish by trying to do as much as I could when it was all still wet. Better I had done the painting in about 3 shifts - but I was on a mission!

It was a relatively simple job to reassemble (once I found a replacement for one of the rubber seals that had gone AWOL! Its there in top right of pics of the parts) so it was soon on the TTR. 

I treated the bike to a new stainless steel rear axle nut whilst I was about it smile

rear-brake 004.jpg

The master cylinder is safely protected by a new Works Connection frame guard and I think it's all beginning to look quite good wink

rear-brake 006.jpg

All that was left was to fix the master cylinder in position.

rear-brake 008.jpg

I haven't fitted the rear brake pedal as it will be easier to fit the engine with it off.

I feel a lot better having got back on the project bike as it was playing on my conscience that I had neglected it.

Next up is back to the front forks and to torque up the steering head bearings and fit the handlebars so it will look like a bike again smile

Brian

 



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